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A Guide to Male Incontinence Causes and Treatments

by Jessica July 21 2016 20:04
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Although Men's Health Month was last month (June), it's still very important to bring awareness year-round to common health issues affecting males. One such condition is incontinence, which can affect either gender. This is a condition where one is unable to control their bladder, which can develop suddenly or gradually over a period of time. 

Given the private nature of this condition, some men may feel embarrassed and will not seek out medical help. In addition to that, men, as a whole, do not go to the doctor as often as women. Therefore, they are less likely to receive a medical diagnosis and treatment plan and could potentially go years living with incontinence.

With this in mind, we want to provide a short guide to help men understand why they may be experiencing urinary incontinence, what they can expect when they visit a doctor, and potential treatment plans. 

What is Male Incontinence?

In a nutshell, male incontinence occurs when a patient can't control his bladder. There are several types of male urinary incontinence:

  1.  The first is stress incontinence. This occurs when an individual lifts a heavy object or strongly coughs and experiences bladder leakage. 
  2.  The second is urge incontinence. When this happens, the bladder contracts for an abnormal reason, which triggers urination.male urologist
  3.  The third is mixed incontinence which is a combination of stress and urge incontinence.
  4.  Finally, the fourth is overflow incontinence. This means that the bladder can't completely empty for some reason (urinary retention) and leakage occurs unexpectedly.

What Causes Male Incontinence?

There are a number of conditions that could potentially cause male urinary incontinence. While aging can certainly perpetuate those conditions, incontinence is not necessarily a normal sign of getting older. Some of the most common causes of male incontinence include an enlarged prostate, Parkinson's disease, and panic disorder. In addition to that, male incontinence could also be the result of a surgery or certain medications. For example, incontinence is a common side effect of prostate removal surgery.

What Might Your Doctor Recommend?

When a patient schedules an appointment with his doctor, the doctor will conduct a complete diagnostic exam to learn more about th
e symptoms and rule out specific conditions. He or she may recommend specific lifestyle changes. 

In the event of total incontinence, or if the symptoms of incontinence cannot be managed, the patient may require ongoing intermittent catheterization. The doctor and/or nurses will provide information on catheter kits, offer instruction on how to self-cath, and show the patient how to maintain a sterile environment to reduce the chances of an infection. In addition, the team of specialists here at 180 Medical can provide support in choosing the correct catheter for your needs, along with answering your insurance questions, offering billing support, and more. 

Male incontinence is more common than you think. If you are experiencing symptoms of incontinence, schedule an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible to get treated and improve your day-to-day life. 

180 Medical Takes Steps for ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk

by Jessica June 15 2016 08:36
Last weekend in Portland, OR, ZERO Prostate Cancer held one of their Run/Walk events at Elizabeth Caruthers Park. When they can, our employees love a chance to get out in their respective communities and give back. So not only did we sponsor the event, but our 180 Medical employees in the local area jumped on board to attend and participate in this great cause, which is close to our hearts because so many of our customers have been affected by prostate cancer. In fact, according to the statistics provided by ZERO, one in seven American men will have prostate cancer in their lifetime. 

zero prostate walk run portland 2016
It was a beautiful, sunny day in the Pacific Northwest, and our employees Kelly, Breena, Julio, and Jesse all had a great time getting out in the fresh air to walk, run, and have some fun with everyone, all united in a single cause to end prostate cancer. ZERO is a national nonprofit organization that works to find a cure for prostate cancer as well as offer education and support to affected men and their families.

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Many prostate cancer survivors were in attendance, and a few of them talked about their personal stories. There were fun activities, and even a children's race, where every one of them got a superhero cape at the end. All in all, it was a really amazing day, and we're proud of our employees who got to take part in the event.

To find out more about ZERO and find out ways that you, too, can help end prostate cancer, learn more at: www.zerocancer.org/participate.


About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 7 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company. She loves writing, playing music, creating art, and spending quality time with her dogs, friends, & family.
 

Closed System Catheters Can Help Those Adjusting to Life in a Wheelchair

by Jessica May 24 2016 21:00
Many new visitors to our website have just recently begun to transition to life in a wheelchair. Whether due to a medical condition, accident, or unexpected illness, we understand that this transition can be jarring. 

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Our founder, Todd Brown, experienced this first-hand after his motocross accident, which left him paralyzed from the chest down. It took time for him to fully adjust to all the changes that came with being a new paraplegic, including struggles with frequent urinary tract infections at first. This can be common for those new to using catheters, since improper use (such as washing and reusing catheters) can lead to UTIs. 

If UTIs are something you've struggled with or want to prevent, consider the following:

1. Talk to your doctor.

Your doctor will be the best person to discuss any infections or illnesses, and they can come up with the right treatment plan based on your individual needs. 

2. Never reuse your catheters.

The FDA has determined that catheters are single-use devices, so be sure to use a catheter only once and then dispose of it, which can help you to avoid potential UTIs.

3. Make sure you're using your catheter properly.

Understanding how to properly catheterize will not only help lower the risk of UTIs, but it will also help you avoid unnecessary irritation. If you choose 180 Medical for your catheter supply needs, we can go over the process with you step-by-step, and we also provide instructional materials such as a detailed DVD and helpful booklets to provide you with the right education you need to get adjusted to your catheter insertion kit.

An important part of Todd's journey away from those frequent UTIs was learning about closed system catheters and their potential benefits for those in wheelchairs.

A closed system catheter can be a great solution for reducing the likelihood of UTIs for new catheter users. Not only does it provide everything in one easy-to-carry package, it also has specific features that can help you out with preventing UTIs as well as remaining in your wheelchair while catheterizing. 
  • Introducer Tip: This pre-lubricated tip on intermittent urinary catheters allows the users to bypass the first few millimeters of the urethra where the largest concentrations of bacteria are located.
  • Insertion Supplies: Closed system catheters often provide extra supplies that can help with the insertion process, such as sterile gloves (especially handy when cathing in public restrooms), antiseptic wipes to sterilize the area where you will insert the catheter, underpad, and more.
  • Ease of use while in a wheelchair: Because a closed system catheter is completely self-contained in a measurable bag, users can remain in their wheelchair, rather than attempt to transfer from chair to toilet every time. Also, any room that allows you privacy can become to a place to self-cath. 
180 Medical makes sure to train our staff well in order to earn the title "Specialist." That's why you can feel confident giving us a call when you're ready to begin ordering your catheter supplies. Not only do we offer helpful materials and treat you like a member of our own family, we have a few members of our staff who have personal experience adjusting to life in a wheelchair and using catheter daily. Give us a call today to see if closed system catheters could be right for you, and get one step closer to living more comfortably.

5 Highlights of Cure Medical Catheters

by Jessica April 14 2016 08:49

Buying the right catheter for your individual needs can make a difference in terms of cost, comfort, safety, and results. We carry quality products from all of the top name-brands on the market today, including GentleCath, Rusch, Bard, and more!

Just one of the many brands that we offer is Cure Medical. Here are some of the highlights and benefits of this particular brand of intermittent catheters:

  1. Latex-free: Not everyone has to worry about latex allergies, but it's important to know that a latex allergy can develop at any time. In most cases, it's best to just avoid the risk. Cure Medical catheters are 100% latex-free. 

    cure straight intermittent catheter
  2. Free of other allergens and chemical compounds: Have you heard of BPA or DEHP? Many people haven't, but these are compounds found in many common objects made of plastic. Research shows that BPA and DEHP can leech out of those plastics, and when they get into the body, they can possibly cause some issues. Both compounds are linked to thyroid problems, and DEHP is linked to a number of conditions including obesity, cancer, fertility issues, and immune disorders. Cure Medical guarantees that their catheters are BPA and DEHP-free.

  3. Easy to use: The guiding principle behind the development of Cure Medical's catheters was not only to make them safe but also easy for the average person to use. 

  4. Benefits a good cause: Cure Medical donates 10% of all their profits to medical research to find a cure for central nervous system disorders and spinal cord injuries. 


180 Medical is proud to carry a wide array of products from Cure, as well as many others. When you order your intermittent catheters from 180 Medical, you can be sure you're receiving a quality product. 
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Of course, the choice of which catheter to use is highly personal and depends on many factors, so no single brand or type of catheter is going to be right for everyone across the board. Please consult with your health care professional to discuss what type might be best for your needs, or contact one of our friendly, highly-trained specialists to discuss your options.

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14 Dos and Don'ts of Self-Cathing

by Jessica February 25 2016 21:38
At 180 Medical, we want to make sure you have all the information you need to stay as healthy as possible, especially when it comes to your catheterization needs. If your doctor or nurse practitioner has prescribed a regimen of self-catheterization, you're not alone. Many people all over the world use catheters every day to help them empty their bladder. All it takes is a little practice. 

Here are some helpful tips:

dos and donts of self cathing

DO:

  1. Gather all your supplies before beginning.
  2. Maintain as sterile an environment for yourself as possible. If you're away from home, we know that can be a little more difficult, since you can't control how clean a public restroom is. Just be sure to wash your hands thoroughly before catheterization and/or put on gloves before beginning. You may also wish to use antiseptic wipes to clean the area before inserting the catheter. A kit of insertion supplies may further to make the procedure more sterile and prevent possible infections. washing hands
  3. Follow the schedule for self-cathing that your healthcare professional prescribed for your specific condition. Stay on the self-catheterization schedule that your healthcare professional instructed you to follow. If you miss your scheduled time, catheterize as soon as you're able to do so. 
  4. Use the right catheter product for your needs, based on your doctor's instructions. 180 Medical has a wide array of all the top brands and types of intermittent catheters, including straight, coude, hydrophilic, closed systems, pediatric, and more. Our highly-trained product specialists would love to help you find the catheter that works and feels best for you. 
  5. Stay hydrated. Drinking plenty of fresh water is good for your urinary system and your whole body. 
  6. Make sure you are using your catheters correctly. Follow the instructions given by your healthcare professional. 180 Medical also carries helpful instructional booklets and DVDs for supplemental education. 
  7. Ask if your insurance plan covers catheter supplies. We are contracted with thousands of plans, and we can contract your insurance for you to find out what kinds of catheter products are covered and how many you could get per month for your specific needs, per your healthcare professional's recommendation. 

DON'T:

  1. Don't reuse catheters. The FDA considers intermittent catheters to be only good for a single use. Studies show that sterile use (using a catheter one time and then disposing of it) reduces risk of urinary tract infections. Most major insurance companies today cover enough catheters for sterile use, because they know that reusing catheters often leads to infections, which can end up costing insurance companies more money. 
  2. Don't use someone else's catheters. We've gotten a few questions before where someone's friend or family member no longer need to use their catheters, and they have a few leftover which they offered to give away. It's risky to use a catheter that is prescribed for someone else, because everyone's body is different. For instance, some people require a coude tip to bypass urethral strictures, when a straight tip catheter just won't do. There are different lengths and French sizes to consider as well. When in doubt, consult your healthcare professional. 
  3. Don't use petroleum jelly to lubricate your catheter. It's best to use sterile water-soluble lubrication to lessen chances of infection and make the catheterization experience more comfortable. 
  4. When using a hydrophilic catheter, don't forget to burst the water packet, which activates the bonded lubrication, making the tube slippery and ready to use. 
  5. Don't forget to bring your catheter supplies with you wherever you go. For more information on catheterizing in public restrooms, go here for a detailed blog by an actual catheter-user.
  6. Don't ignore the signs of a urinary tract infection: fever, chills, aching in the lower back, cloudy or smelly urine, and burning sensations. See your doctor to have tests run and cultures taken at the first sign, so that it can be treated properly. 
  7. Don't worry too much. Remember that many people self-cath every day. As you continue, it will get easier, and eventually you'll be a seasoned pro. 
180 Medical has provided superior service and quality catheter and ostomy supplies to customers for years. Give us a call or contact us on live chat to see why so many choose and stay with us for their much-needed supplies. 

Disclaimer: Please note that this is intended to provide a general understanding of self-catheterization. It should not be used in place of a visit, call, or consultation with a physician or other healthcare provider.


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About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 6 years and currently works as Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company! She loves writing, music, art, and & spending time with her dogs, friends & family.
 

180 Medical Product News: Introducing GentleCath Pro Catheters

by Jessica February 22 2016 12:10
180 medical product news
Interested in keeping up with the latest catheter and ostomy products available on the market? 180 Medical is always ready to share the scoop on the newest supplies with you, and today, we'd like to introduce you to ConvaTec's new line of GentleCath™ Pro Closed-System Intermittent Catheters. 

What are the features of the GentleCath™ Pro?

gentlecath pro catheter componentsThe GentleCath™ Pro Closed-System was designed to minimize risk of infection and allow easier and more sterile catheterization. The system has an introducer tip as well as an all-in-one collection bag, which allows for "no touch" catheterization in a more portable system that is convenient for use both at home or away from home and traveling. Because you only touch the system's outer collection bag, not the catheter tube itself, this helps to reduce the risk of infection that can sometimes occur when bacteria from hands transfers to the catheter.

Breakdown of the main features:
  • Collection bag which allows you to measure and see the amount of urine drained
  • Portable system allows for easy catheterization away from home or when a restroom is not easily accessible
  • Pre-lubricated introducer tip, which allows the catheter itself to bypass the first few millimeters of the urethra, where bacteria is most highly concentrated
  • Also includes an underpad, gloves, non-staining antiseptic pad, and additional lubricating jelly

How do I use the GentleCath™ Pro?

For more information regarding how to catheterize, feel free to call one of our trained specialists so we can walk you through the process. 180 Medical also has one-of-a-kind catheterization instruction materials that we can send to you with your order, including a step-by-step DVD and printed color brochures.

Which GentleCath™ Products Does 180 Medical Carry?

180 Medical proudly carries GentleCath's entire product line, including their 100% latex-free PVC (vinyl) intermittent catheters, red rubber catheters, hydrophilic catheters, closed-system catheters, and catheter kits, all of which are available with both straight and coude tip options.

How Can I Find a Catheter That's Right for Me?

Just contact 180 Medical by filling out our online inquiry form, connecting to us via Live Chat, or giving us a call at 1-877-688-2729 to speak to one of our trained, friendly specialists. We are happy to find the right catheter for your needs, and we can verify your insurance to determine if and how these products are covered on your policy. 

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About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 6 years and currently works as Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company! She loves writing, music, art, and & spending time with her dogs, friends & family.
 

Advantages of Intermittent Cathing

by Jessica January 19 2016 15:38
You may have heard the term “intermittent catheterization” before, but you may not be completely clear as to what it means. Intermittent catheterization is the process of using a catheter to drain your bladder on a regular or semi-regular basis, rather than letting the catheter stay inside the bladder to continually drain the bladder into a collection bag (an indwelling or foley catheter is used for that purpose).  Typically, this is only required when there is something hindering the bladder’s ability to void urine naturally. An intermittent catheter offers many advantages and health benefits; read on to better understand intermittent catheterization and how it can help you.

The Purpose of Intermittent Catheterization

Intermittent catheterization is commonly used by those who experience incontinence, bladder problems, or urinary retention. Those who have a spinal cord injury, spina bifida, or a neurological problem also often require the use of intermittent catheters to drain their bladders. It may also be used temporarily after certain surgeries such as prostate surgery or an abdominal hysterectomy.  
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Your healthcare practitioner will instruct you on how to properly use an intermittent catheter, including how often you will need to drain your bladder based on your needs. Because catheters come in different types and sizes, your doctor will also help you determine which one is best for you and your condition. 180 Medical helps make shopping for catheters fast and easy, as you can conveniently see our selection of catheters online.

The Benefits of Intermittent Catheterization

  • It's Fairly Simple: While it may seem a little intimidating at first, self-cathing can become a relatively quick and simple procedure after a little bit of practice. Many people are able to catheterize themselves, or do so with the help of a caregiver.
  • It’s an Effective Solution: Neglecting to empty your bladder regularly can lead to urinary tract infections or even bladder infections. Intermittent catheterization is an effective solution to helping those who have difficulty emptying their bladders and helping prevent such health problems if done correctly. 
  • It’s Safe to Use: Compared to indwelling foley catheters, intermittent catheters have been found to cause less infections. Since foley catheters stay in the body for longer periods of time, urinary tract infections can become a constant problem for some.  By using an intermittent catheter, the chance of experiencing these side effects is greatly reduced. 
  • Inexpensive: Some healthcare and medical products can be relatively expensive out of pocket. Depending on your insurance provider, they may or may not cover certain items. Intermittent straight catheters are often the best option for those who are uninsured or underinsured, because they are rather inexpensive. 
  • Promotes Independence: Because intermittent catheters allow you to gain control of your bladder and care for yourself, they help promote independence and, more importantly, allow you a better quality of life.

 If you have any questions or would like to learn more about how we can offer you quality catheters along with top-notch service, please contact our catheter specialists at 1-877-688-2729 or via our Live Chat feature online.

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What Is a Closed System Catheter?

by Jessica December 1 2015 12:49

You may already be aware that intermittent catheters come in all kinds, materials, sizes, and brands. Each person that needs to use catheters has their own preferences and particular needs that will determine what type of catheter may work best for them, whether that’s a regular straight catheter, a catheter with a coude tip, hydrophilic catheters, male or female or pediatric length, or a more advanced product called a closed system catheter. Today, we’re going to shed some light on exactly what a closed system catheter is and break down each component of this product, along with the benefits, including how it can possibly help make one’s self-catheterization routine easier and more hygienic. 

WHAT IS A CLOSED SYSTEM CATHETER?

A closed system catheter is, at a quick glance, a self-contained, sterile, pre-lubricated catheter housed within a collection bag. The collection bag eliminates the need to void the urine into a receptacle or toilet, and since it’s already self-containing, it also eliminates the need to hook up any other kind of bag or container. It’s basically ready to use once it has been opened. These systems often include other features to help assist with the catheterization process and keep everything more sterile. As with all other types of catheters, its main function is to drain the bladder of all urine in a comfortable, smooth process while minimizing risk of bacterial infection of the urinary tract and/or bladder.

WHAT ARE THE FEATURES OF THE CLOSED SYSTEM CATHETER?

While there will definitely be some variance between brands, the majority of closed system catheters will have the same basic parts, as you can see in the below diagram.
closed system catheter

HERE ARE SOME ADDITIONAL FEATURES:

Many brands offer insertion supplies to help assist in the catheterization routine, which may include an opaque refuse/trash bag to hide/store the used catheter system, antiseptic wipes (typically povidone-iodine or BZK) to disinfect hands and the area of insertion, gloves to keep hands covered and reduce risk of infection, additional lubrication to make the catheter insertion more smooth (if needed), and a sterile underpad to set supplies or to protect your from any residual liquid. 


HOW DO I USE A CLOSED SYSTEM CATHETER?

For more detailed information regarding how to catheterize, please call one of our trained specialists at 1-877-688-2729 so we can walk you through that process. 180 Medical also has one-of-a-kind catheterization instruction materials we can send to you with your order, including a step by step DVD and detailed, colorful brochures, as well as online instructions for our customers.

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF USING A CLOSED SYSTEM CATHETER?

There are a few potential advantages of using a closed system catheter. It can be especially helpful for those with limited dexterity and/or in wheelchairs. The self-contained collection bag eliminates the need to try to find another receptacle, such as a separate bag, toilet/urinal, or other container for such purpose. One can catheterize from the wheelchair or any place with privacy.

Another benefit is the helpful introducer tip, which bypasses the first few millimeters of the urethra (where the majority of bacteria collect), allowing the catheter itself to pass through the urethra while minimizing risk of infection.

It’s a much more sterile process, because the catheter can be inserted without ever touching the actual tube, which can also lessen the possibility of bacterial contamination.

ARE CLOSED SYSTEM CATHETERS AVAILABLE IN MY SIZE?

It's highly likely, as many brands of closed system catheters will offer straight or coude tip, pediatric sizes, male or female length, various materials such as vinyl and red rubber, and a range of the common French sizes.

WHICH CLOSED SYSTEM CATHETERS DOES 180 MEDICAL CARRY?

180 Medical proudly carries catheters from all of the leading manufacturers and brands available today. Take a look at our online catheter showcase to view a few of the available options.

HOW CAN I FIND A CATHETER THAT'S RIGHT FOR ME?

Just contact 180 Medical by filling out our online inquiry form, connect to us via our online Live Chat, or give us a call at 1-877-688-2729 to speak to one of our highly trained, friendly specialists. We are happy to help you find the right catheter for your needs, and we can verify your insurance to determine if and how these products are covered on your policy.

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Understanding the Difference Between Catheter Types

by Jessica November 19 2015 18:27
Getting acclimated to using a catheter on a regular basis can seem daunting at first, whatever the reason for the need. After all, it can feel like a big change in regards to your life and daily schedule. Finding out as much information as you can about catheterization can help you feel more comfortable with the process overall. The very first thing you're probably going to want to understand will be the differences between the various types of catheters that are available to you. As always, consult your doctor before purchasing or using any sort of medical device. 
gentlecath catheters

Let's examine the main two types of urological catheters:

Indwelling Foley Catheters

If your doctor has determined that you'll need to use a catheter for a long period of time (or even indefinitely), and an intermittent catheter is not an option for whatever reason, then you may have an indwelling, or foley, catheter inserted. This type of catheter is usually inserted at your healthcare practitioner's office. They are usually inserted through the urethra (unless this is no longer a viable entry-point, in which case they can be surgically placed through a stoma) and are held in place by a small balloon that is inflated once the insertion tip has reached the bladder. The downside of using a foley catheter is that it can leave you more susceptible to urinary tract and/or bladder infections, since it is left inside the body for long periods of time. 

Intermittent Catheters

These types of catheters are inserted to drain the bladder and then thrown away. Your doctor or healthcare practitioner will teach you how to insert the catheter yourself, since you will likely be doing this on a regular basis. Your doctor will let you know how often to drain your bladder with a catheter, based on your individual needs. They come in a variety of options: straight tip, coude tip, varying lengths (male, female, pediatric), pre-lubricated, hydrophilic, and closed systems with collection bags

There are many factors when it comes to choosing from the various types of catheters. Your healthcare practitioner will help you determine which kind will be best for you. It's a good idea to also do proper research for yourself or the loved one in your life that will be relying on a catheter for any amount of time. Depending on your needs, you may also want or even require a few accessories such as disinfecting wipes, gloves, underpads, drain bags, etc. 

With the right research and professional guidance, you'll be able to make this transition as easily as possible. Contact us at 180 Medical to get the right intermittent catheter for you. 

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Does It Matter What Brand of Catheter You Use?

by Jessica November 10 2015 11:57
For some, the topic of catheters can seem overwhelming, especially for individuals who are new to learning to self-cath. Whether you'll be using intermittent catheters temporarily or on a long-term basis, you’ll be surprised by how simple the process can be once you’re familiar with it. Don’t get too overwhelmed by all the information out there, and know that you are not alone when it comes to catheterization. Plenty of people every day begin to self-cath and are becoming more comfortable with it as they go. Just take it one day at a time.

gentlecath closedOne point of confusion about catheters that our customers sometimes encounter is trying to figure out which particular product to use. While your doctor will serve as a great resource in determining what type of catheter is best for you to use, there are some decisions you can make on your own, such as what brand of catheter to buy. 

So, does it really matter what brand of catheter you use? There are some product differences from brand to brand, but when you get your catheter supply from a reliable source, you can feel comfortable in knowing you’ll be taken care of. Reputable and well-known medical supply companies such as 180 Medical carry a wide selection of quality products from all of the top brands today, so you can rest assured that you’ll find the right product for your needs. 

Even so, there are leading brands in the industry with which you might want to be familiar: Bard, Coloplast, GentleCath, HollisterMTG, Rochester, Rusch, LoFric, Cure, and Hi-Slip, just to name a few.

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180 Medical is proud to carry a wide array of products from these well-known brands and many others. When you order your intermittent catheters from 180 Medical, you can be sure you're receiving a quality product. Adjusting to life with a catheter can take time, so it's our goal to make the process of purchasing them as easy and convenient as possible. We have one-of-a-kind instructional materials available as well, which can help you see and understand the self-cathing procedures with step-by-step catheterization instructions in print and on DVD. We have material available for men, women, girls, and boys. We also have catheter users on staff who can share their experiences and tips.

Contact us today to discuss your options and find the right brand for your needs!

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