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Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Day Honored at 180 Medical

by Jessica September 29 2017 05:13
This is our second year at 180 Medical to set aside a special day to honor all those living with spinal cord injuries, including many of our patients, family, and friends, as well as our founder Todd Brown. We like to take time to do what we can to raise awareness about spinal cord injuries both in and outside of work, and our Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Day gave our employees an opportunity to not only help raise funds to directly benefit people living with spinal cord injuries but also experience firsthand what it's like to maneuver around the workplace in a wheelchair. 

spinal cord injury awareness at 180 medical

Representing in Green

We all made it a point to wear green on SCI Day. Some of us wore green t-shirts or cardigans, even green pants and glasses frames, and others went all the way and wore as much green as they could! One of our employees even dyed his beard green for the day.

We felt that wearing green, which is the official color for Spinal Cord Injury Awareness, would be a great way to show our support and join in solidarity as a group for the cause.

180 medical wearing green for spinal cord injury awareness day


Raising Funds for the Spinal Cord Injured

Part of the fun of SCI Day was our lunchtime fundraiser, which was held at both our warehouse and our main headquarters locations here in Oklahoma City. Everyone enjoyed a few slices of pizza and brownies, and it was even more delicious knowing we were raising funds for a great cause.

Together, as a company, all employees were given the opportunity to vote which organization we want to support with this year's SCI Day Pizza & Brownie Fundraiser. We were excited to find out that by the end of the day, we had raised over $500, which will directly go to benefit people with spinal cord injuries at the organization, Will2Walk.

180 medical spinal cord injury awareness fundraiser

SCI Day Wheelchair Challenge

As part of our Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Day, we wanted to give our employees a chance to take the Wheelchair Challenge and spend time during the day in a manual wheelchair. Since our company specializes in intermittent catheters and related urological supplies, along with ostomy supplies, we interact regularly with many customers who live with spinal cord injuries and use catheters daily.

We truly care about each of our customers as if they were a part of our 180 family, and it's important for us to take time to know as much as we can about spinal cord injuries as well as the challenges that those living with SCI face on a regular basis.

180 medical spinal cord injury awareness wheelchair challenge


Even though our employees were only able to get a half hour of maneuvering around in a wheelchair to make sure everyone who signed up had a chance, the impact it made was clear! Every person learned something from their experience.

Some of the biggest challenges that our many participants discovered were getting in and out of the handicapped stall in the bathroom, holding and carrying food and drinks, trying to get items from shelves, getting on and off the elevator, maneuvering through doorways, and going any place outside, especially uphill ramps and inclines.

Brent, one of our Documentation Specialists, discovered first-hand how difficult getting around and completing daily tasks can be from the seat of a wheelchair. He says, "I see now more than ever how someone with a spinal cord injury must be incredibly strong, both mentally and physically. I respect them very much." 

sci connectionThere were many challenges that some told us they had never considered before, like opening a refrigerator door and getting items out or even going to the restroom.

Amanda from our Accounting department learned that, "I have full advantage of what appears to be the simplest tasks, like reaching the top shelves in the break room, using the stairs, walking across the sidewalk without running into things. I feel truly honored to work for a company that takes the extra step to help support those with spinal cord injuries and other conditions."

Customer Specialist Meghan said she found going uphill the most trying challenge, but her personal experience was really moving and brings to light one of the big issues that many living with spinal cord injuries face. "It takes a lot of work just moving around. Without the help of others, it can feel very isolating," she told us.

This is such a big part of why we want to raise awareness. We want those living with spinal cord injuries to know they are not alone! There are support groups and great in-person communities that those with spinal cord injuries can join, and there are activities like adaptive sports, arts, and crafts that many can still participate in, depending on their injury level. 

Greg, also one of our Customer Specialists, summed up what he learned with four simple but serious words: "Take nothing for granted."

This year really helped many more of us realize just a fraction of the challenges that those living with spinal cord injuries face, and we were all happy to do our part in raising awareness. Overall, SCI Day at 180 Medical was once again a fun and educational time that allowed us all a chance to participate and give back during Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month.


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About the Author:
Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company.

180 Medical Honors Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month

by Jessica September 20 2017 06:00
September is dedicated to raising awareness about spinal cord injuries (SCI). This is an especially important time to 180 Medical, since our founder lives with a spinal cord injury, as well as many of our customers, who we consider a part of the 180 family!

spinal cord injury awareness month 2017


What Is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month?

Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month is a time to spread awareness about spinal cord injuries, the potential risk factors, and safety precautions that can be taken to reduce the number of injuries in the future. At the same time, it's incredibly important to acknowledge the many living with spinal cord injuries in the world today and pay tribute to their bravery and perseverance.

According to the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center, here are some of the most recent facts about spinal cord injuries:
spinal cord injury awareness fact 1
Around 285,000 people are living with spinal cord injuries in the United States.

spinal cord injury fact 2
About 17,500 new spinal cord injury cases occur in the United States every year.

spinal cord injury fact 3
Males account for about 81% of new spinal cord injury cases.

spinal cord injury fact 4
The leading causes of spinal cord injuries are vehicle crashes, followed by falls, acts of violence, and sports.



The effects of spinal cord injuries are often life-altering, but even so, those affected can live normal, healthy lives after rehabilitation. Many people with spinal cord injuries go on to achieve things many thought impossible or use their experience to help positively impact others' lives, like Mason Ellis, Jen Goodwin, and Tricia Downing, just to name a few.

todd brown founder of 180 medicalOur company's founder, Todd Brown, is also a wonderful example of this, and of course, his experience makes the cause of Spinal Cord Injury Awareness very dear to our hearts here at 180 Medical.

After being paralyzed from the chest down in a motocross accident, Todd discovered first-hand what it was like to readjust to the world navigating in a wheelchair. He dealt with urinary tract infections while reusing catheters and also had the unfortunate experience of finding out that there weren't many companies out there with employees who truly seemed to care or have much knowledge about his condition or the products he needed.

That experience is what led him to create 180 Medical in order to help others living with spinal cord injuries and other conditions that require the use of catheters, related urologic supplies, and ostomy products, in the hope that he could help turn their lives around. 

180 Medical Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Day

To honor Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month as well as raise awareness, 180 Medical is planning a company SCI Day at our Oklahoma City headquarters on September 27th for the second year. We'll have some fun opportunities for our employees to get involved, such as a pizza fundraiser, wearing green for awareness, and more!

180 medical sci awareness day 2016

At 180 Medical, we truly care about raising awareness about spinal cord injuries just as much as we care about every single one of our customers. We see firsthand how much this type of injury can impact and change lives.

sci connectionThanks to new research into spinal cord injuries, technology continues to advance in order to make everyday life more adaptable for those living with spinal cord injuries, including products such as closed system catheters, which provide an easier and more hygienic way to self-cath for many.

We make it a point to do what we can to support spinal cord injury groups, including our SCI Day Pizza Fundraiser, and we participate in community events when we can, such as the recent INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehab Courage Run and the annual Corporate Challenge, which goes to support disabled athletes in the Endeavor Games.

If you or a loved one are newly injured and looking for a catheter supplier who will offer you compassion and understanding, we're here for you!

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About the Author:
Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company.

Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Day at 180 Medical

by Jessica September 28 2016 20:06


Each year, we like to shine a spotlight on the importance of Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month, which is in September each year. This not only brings more visibility to the impact on the lives of the 450,000 people living with SCI (Spinal Cord Injuries) in the United States alone, but it also offers an opportunity to educate ways to prevent injuries like this as well as bringing more public support for organizations that help support those with SCI and offer them resources and hope. This month, we decided to bring awareness in a different way that allows all our employees to have an opportunity to participate, experience, and give back. 

For SCI Awareness Day at 180 Medical, we all wore green shirts (the official color of Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month), including all of our offices across the USA and our corporate headquarters located in Oklahoma City, OK.

sci awareness day 180 medical
Another great addition to the day was our delicious pizza and brownies sale over the lunch hours, hosted by our 180 Way Committee, in order to raise funds to benefit a spinal cord injury organization, which will be determined and voted on by our employees. 



On top of that, we also gave employees at our headquarters an opportunity to volunteer and see what it's really like to get around during the day in a wheelchair. Overall, the main consensus from employees who volunteered to sign up for time in the wheelchair was the realization of how difficult everything became suddenly in a wheelchair, and what a unique, educational experience it was for them.

Here are three quotes with just a little bit of the great feedback we received from our employees on what the opportunity meant to them.

sci awareness day 2016 180 medical quotes from employees 
The day brought some light to all of us as to the struggles that those living with a spinal cord injury may face every day and especially at first as they begin to learn how to maneuver through life anew in a wheelchair. We were all glad to wear green and take part in a day to bring awareness to those living with SCI every day. 

Learn more about Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month:
spinal cord injury awareness month 2016

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 7 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company. 

 

8 Tips for Adapting After a Spinal Cord Injury

by billf September 27 2016 18:24
tips for adapting after an SCI


My name is Bill, and I have worked for 180 Medical for over 10 years. bill f 180 medicalAbout 26 years ago, I was involved in a motocross accident that rendered me quadriplegic. You can learn more about my story here. Over the years since then, I've been able to use my experiences to help and counsel others who are also dealing with life after a spinal cord injury. I am happiest when I am helping others, and these days at 180 Medical, I spend a lot of time just talking to our customers on the phone who are new to self-catheterizing.

As you may already know, September is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month, so, as a C5-6 quadriplegic, I'd like to share a few helpful tips for anyone living with an SCI, particularly those new to their injury and recently released from their rehabilitation center.

1. Plan a daily routine. 
While in rehabilitation therapy, my fellow patients and I were woken up every day at 6:00 a.m. and kept to a pretty orderly schedule from morning to night. If your rehab was anything like mine, they probably had you on a daily schedule like this. I recommend trying to stick to something similar, or perhaps you can come up with a daily routine of your own that will work better for your individual needs.

Having a routine re-establishes a sense of dependable structure after such an injury that does alter your life in many ways. When we create positive habits, whether we live with a SCI or not, this practice has a way of enhancing your life. Especially in early recovery after you're released, having too much extra time without a schedule or tasks to do can lead to depression. Find something you love to do or participate in, create a routine, and eventually, it will become a habit.

Important note: Be sure to continue your self-cathing and bowel program as your doctor or healthcare professional has prescribed. 


2. Exercise and eat well.
Exercise will help you maintain or even lose weight, if necessary. I know it's not uncommon for those with spinal cord injuries to gain weight once they are in a wheelchair, mainly due to inactivity. But it's important to try your best to stay in shape, and not just because it's always a great idea to maintain optimal health, no matter your level of injury. Exercise may also help you regain your independence, and you might find that it becomes a lot easier to transfer from your wheelchair to your car, a toilet, or to your bed, and continue your other daily activities.  

While in rehabilitation therapy, you may have been taught a daily exercise routine with weights, resistance bands, and wheelchair pushes, as I was. When you return home after your release, you might not have access to all the necessary equipment at home. It might be worth checking with your rehabilitation center to see if they offer continuing outpatient-based visits, so you can continue to use their equipment or get assistance with workouts. You might also check with your local gym or fitness center, as they might also have adaptive equipment.

For exercising at home, you may find, as I have, that resistance bands are a great help, because they're not only very effective but inexpensive as well. You can also purchase hand weights or even wrist band weights if you have limited hand dexterity like me.

Continuing to work on pushing your own wheelchair (if you are physically able), is also of great importance. I recall when I first returned home, I would spend an hour during the day pushing my chair as long and hard as I could. At first, I could barely push up a ramp, but with continued effort, I was able to push on my own for a few miles, which was a huge success! I also made sure to keep going to my local rehab center at least three times a week to lift weights and resistance train.

Maintaining a healthy diet is also important to your health. Your rehabilitation therapist or healthcare professional may be able to counsel you on the best foods for your health or refer you to a certified nutritionist to formulate a specialized diet for you.


3. Consider going back to school or work.
If you already had a job before your injury and are planning on returning to work after rehab, your employer should assist you in making any necessary accommodations, so you can continue to work for them. If you are interested in trying to go back to work or plan on working in the future, get in contact with your local Department of Rehabilitation Services, who can assist you in helping find a job, as well as designing a plan and providing you with the necessary accommodations you might require in order to work. They can also assist you in making a plan for any continuing education. Fortunately, they also often offer resources that may help pay for all or part of your education costs. 

There are also scholarships available to those with disabilities, such as 180 Medical's annually offered College Scholarship Program. You can learn more about that at our scholarship page.

Most schools and universities have a department specifically to assist those of us with disabilities. They help make sure that your classes are accessible for you, and if you have any other special needs, they can work to make the necessary accommodations for you. Examples of this could range from getting someone to assist you in taking notes to getting a classroom location changed, if the original classroom is not physically accessible. 

I knew a young man who had done construction work all of his life, and, after breaking his back, he realized that he would no longer be able to do that type of work anymore. Even though he had limited education originally, he decided to go back to school went back to school, ended up becoming an attorney, and has been very successful.

No matter what you were doing before you had your spinal cord injury, the sky is the limit on what you can do in the future. While it took me a while before I was able to get my first job, I was so grateful to finally have a daily purpose with going to work, because I was starting to get depressed by not doing anything. No matter what your level of injury is, see what job options might be available to you if that is of interest.


4. Join a local support group.
I can't say enough good things about support groups. These meetings can be so beneficial. Not only does it allow you to share ideas with people who are going or have gone through the same things, but some of my best friends today are people I met through my local support group.

Most states, cities, or larger towns have spinal cord injury support group meetings or an association of some sort. For example, i'm originally from a small town of approximately 15,000 people, and even there, we had a group that met every month. There were not that many of us, but it was nice to meet people in my area with similar disabilities and understood some of the issues I was also encountering. If you live in a rural area, you might have to travel to get to the nearest meeting. The Spinal Cord Association in Oklahoma City offers their meetings by Skype, so that people who are unable to make it to the meeting can still participate. If there is not already a support group in your area yet, you might consider starting one.


5. Use the Internet.
There is a wealth of information available to you on the internet, from educational information, community activities, local support groups, helpful webinars, adaptive equipment and clothing, charitable associations, and more. If you have found this article, then you already know what I mean. I have written several blogs for 180 Medical discussing all types of issues which you may also find helpful, all the way from achieving independence as a quadriplegic, traveling, adaptive clothing for people in wheelchairs, and even my experience with adaptive sports like kayaking.  

Some great resources to start:
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation
National Spinal Cord Injury Association (United Spinal)
Bryon Riesch Paralysis Foundation
Progressive Independence
DREAM (Disability Rights, Education, Activism, and Mentoring)
Dream2Walk 
Triumph Foundation
Facing Disability


6. Start driving again.
For me, personally, getting behind the wheel again was the biggest step in feeling as if I had gained my independence back. While I know that some people have too great a level of injury to be able to drive themselves, many others are still able to do so.

Most paraplegics are able to transfer into a car or truck, break their wheelchair down, and load it into their vehicle, so the only modifications they may require are hand controls and possibly a steering wheel knob. These modifications are usually under a few thousand dollars. As a quadriplegic, I require a van with a lift, automatic door openers, a 6-way seat base, hand controls, and a tri-pin on my steering wheel. These adaptive modifications to one's vehicle can end up being very costly, however. There are more types of modifications available.

If your ultimate goal is to get back to work, then the Department of Rehabilitation Services might help pay for the disability modifications, but you are responsible for paying for the vehicle. If you currently have a vehicle, check to see if it can be modified. If you are purchasing a new vehicle to have modified, most manufacturers offer up to $1000 to assist in paying for your adaptive equipment. 


7. Participate in Adaptive Sports and Recreation.

bill adaptive kayaking 180 medicalWhether you want to professionally compete in sports or just enjoy doing something for fun, there are so many options available to you, both indoors and outdoors. I personally enjoy swimming, kayaking, riding my hand-crank bike, water-skiing, and I even went snow-skiing once but haven’t had the opportunity to go back yet. Check your local resources and give the internet a quick search to see what is available. 

A few helpful organizations and informational websites:
Life Rolls On (Surf and Skating events)
National Wheelchair Basketball Association
VA Adaptive Sports (US Department of Veterans Affairs)
Disabled Sports USA (this includes local chapters and youth programs as well)
Blaze Sports America
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation information on Team Sports
Paralyzed Veterans of America Sports
Oklahoma Adaptive Sports Association (OKASA)
U.S. Paralympics
Adaptive Sports USA
Adaptive Adventures

8. Never give up.
Above all, don't lose hope! Life is not over for you, even if it has been drastically changed by your injury. There is help and assistance available, and many opportunities exist out there.

As someone who has been where you are right now as a newly injured person living with a spinal cord injury, I wish you all the best on your new journey and hope you will be able to reach out for any support you may need at this crucial time in your life.

Did you know that September is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month? Learn more:
spinal cord injury awareness month 2016

 
bill bio pic 180 medical employee
Bill has worked for 180 Medical for over 10 years. He loves getting to talk to our customers, sharing his first-hand experiences as a quadriplegic, and helping those with in-depth questions about self-catheterization. He enjoys spending time outdoors, as well as watching and attending motocross events. Learn more about Bill's story.

2016 180 Medical College Scholarship Recipients: Focus on Jared

by Jessica September 20 2016 20:58
Earlier this summer, we were proud to be able to announce the names of each of our 2016 College Scholarship recipients. This year, there were so many deserving candidates with inspirational backstories and exciting goals, whether to be able to return to school after a long absence in hopes to renew a career path or just starting out as a college freshman with dreams of being able to help others with their future job. We are honored to be able to help these seven students get a little closer to their goals. 

Throughout the following months, we will continue to feature each one of our recipients on our blog, so sign up for our newsletter so you can get notified every time we publish a new blog. Previously, we have featured Macy. This week, we are happy to feature Jared Grier, the second of our seven scholarship winners.

jared 180 medical college scholarship winner 2016
When Jared was just 19, he anticipated there might be many transitions in the course of life ahead, but one day brought a life-alteringjared and his frat brothers 180 medical college scholarship winner change he could have never expected after finishing up his first year of college. During a fun outing with friends at a local park, he climbed a tree, just as he had many times before, but when he tried to get down, he fell and landed on his neck, fracturing his C6 vertebrae and rendering him quadriplegic. Since that time, he has gone through some very difficult challenges such as multiple surgeries, rehabilitation, and continuing therapy. Once he was home, he says he "made it [his] goal to return to campus as fast as possible." 

His fraternity, Lambda Chi Alpha, has been a huge part of his life since entering college, and his brothers joined together with him to create a fundraising campaign, called the Grierstrong Movement, which was originally made to garner support for Jared by the organizations on his college campus. Now, Grierstrong continues to grow with aims to bring awareness to the community about spinal cord injuries and the impact they can have on people's lives.

As of the beginning of the fall semester, Jared is continuing forward with his education, unwilling to give up on his goals at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where he plans to graduate with a degree in mechanical engineering.

We are truly impressed by Jared's commitment to continue forward and turn a potentially devastating injury into a direction that helps positively impact others' lives. You can learn more about the Grierstrong Movement at grierstrong.com.

180 Medical is honored to offer an annual scholarship program to help those with spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, transverse myelitis, ostomies (ileostomy, urostomy, and/or colostomy), and/or a neurogenic bladder. We know paying for college isn't easy these days, and we also understand that there can often be extra financial difficulties for aspiring students who live with these conditions. That's why we created this program. To learn more about our annual College Scholarship, visit our Scholarship page

Did you know that September is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month? Learn more:
spinal cord injury awareness month 2016

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 7 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company. 

 

2016 180 Medical College Scholarship Recipients: Focus on Macy

by Jessica September 8 2016 08:04
Earlier this summer, we were proud to be able to announce the names of each of our 2016 College Scholarship recipients. This year, there were so many deserving candidates with inspirational backstories and exciting goals, whether to be able to return to school after a long absence in hopes to renew a career path or just starting out as a college freshman with dreams of being able to help others with their future job. We are honored to be able to help these seven students get a little closer to their goals. 

Throughout the following months, we will be featuring each recipient on our blog, so sign up for our newsletter so you can get notified every time we publish a new blog. This week, we are happy to feature Macy Huff, the first of our seven scholarship winners.

macy 180 medical college scholarship winner quote

Macy's life changed unexpectedly and dramatically when she sustained a spinal cord injury when she was only 15 years old during a tumbling/cheer-leading accident, which left her paralyzed without the use of her arms and legs. There were many new challenges that she has faced and overcome as a C5-6 quadriplegic, and she feels that it changed her life in more ways than that. During her time in rehab at Riley Children's Hospital, she encountered some very helpful and encouraging Child Life Therapists that had a big impact on her life.

macy cheerleading senior pic"They taught me how to advocate for myself, make physical adaptations, and approach learning in a different way," Macy says. "I hope to one day pay it forward and assist others who find themselves in a similar situation as I found myself in April of 2013."

As of the beginning of the fall semester, Macy has started on her undergraduate studies at Franklin College with a major in Education, which she hopes to use to either become a Child Life Therapist or a Special Education Teacher, so that she can positively impact others' lives too, just as the therapists, teachers, and assistants who she has met since her accident have impacted her life. And not only will she be carrying a full-time college class load, she is also elated to have been invited to cheer with the Franklin College cheer squad. 

Outside of school, Macy has devoted her time to volunteering at her local food pantry, coaching cheer, participating in Student Council, Key Club, and Best Buddies (a peer mentoring program for students with disabilities). 

Macy's commitment to never give up, despite the odds, is truly inspiring, and we're sure she will find success in her future endeavors. 

180 Medical is honored to offer an annual scholarship program to help those with spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, transverse myelitis, ostomies (ileostomy, urostomy, and/or colostomy), and/or a neurogenic bladder. We know paying for college isn't easy these days, and we also understand that there can often be extra financial difficulties for aspiring students who live with these conditions. That's why we created this program. To learn more about our annual College Scholarship, visit our Scholarship page

Did you know that September is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month? Learn more:

sci awareness month footer

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 7 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company. She loves writing, playing music, creating art, and spending quality time with her dogs, friends, & family.
 

A Look at National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month

by Jessica September 1 2016 08:47
sci awareness month blog header
Did you know that September is National Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Awareness Month? Originally cosponsored by Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson, the bill for this awareness month was created to recognize the prevalence of spinal cord injuries in the country as well as highlight the achievements of those who living such an injury are accomplishing.

According to the Paralyzed Veterans of America, a person becomes paralyzed every 48 seconds in the United States. Here are several other statistics of note about spinal cord injuries, presented by the United Spinal Association:

  • There are approximately 12,500 new spinal cord injuries each year. 
  • The number of people in the United States in 2014 who have a spinal cord injury has been estimated to be approximately 276,000 (with a range from 240,000 to as many as 337,000 individuals).
  • The average age at injury has increased from 29 years of age during the 1970s to 42 years since 2010.
  • Approximately 79% of spinal cord injuries occur among males.
  • Vehicle crashes are the leading cause of injury, followed by falls, acts of violence (primarily gunshot wounds), and sports-related accidents.

Overcoming Adversity of a Spinal Cord Injury

man in wheelchair sci monthThe effects of a spinal cord injury can be life-altering, but it is important to know that individuals can often overcome the challenges of their condition and go on to live a normal life and achieve great things. 

180 Medical's founder, Todd Brown, is one of those people. Todd was involved in a motocross accident in 1994 that left him paralyzed from the chest down. Since that time, he has had to deal with the daily challenges that anyone with a SCI might encounter. He started 180 Medical because of his own experiences, including suffering from urinary tract infections from having to reuse his intermittent catheters. 

After learning about closed system catheter kits from some of his friends in the adaptive cycle racing community, he saw great improvements in his health and his day-to-day life. With the right catheters for his needs, he was better able to manage his condition and felt his life had been turned around. Todd wanted to help others in his situation, and as a result, he started his company. Today, 180 Medical is a leading supplier of urinary catheter supplies.

What Can You Do to Help?

Chances are that many of us know someone who has suffered from a spinal cord injury. The goal of SCI Awareness Month is to educate the general public on its prevalence, ways we can prevent these events from occurring, and how to best provide treatment and support for those living with a spinal cord injury.

There are a number of ways you can help the cause and spread awareness:
  1.  Make a donation to a spinal cord injury foundation or charity, such as the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation. This will help with funding for research for a cure as well as advocate for others in need.
  2.  If you know someone with a spinal cord injury, take some time to acknowledge what they're going through and congratulate them on overcoming their challenges. 
  3.  Consider joining the National Spinal Cord Injury Association's United Spinal Team Advocacy group to help work for change, stay in the loop on upcoming events, and find information on local support groups. 
  4.  Share helpful facts and information about SCI on your social media accounts throughout September. 

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180 Medical Recognizes Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month

by Jessica September 4 2014 16:55
September 1st marks the beginning of a full month dedicated to raising awareness about spinal cord injuries.

spinal cord injury awareness month 180 medical
It's important for us all to be aware of spinal cord injuries and the life-changing effects they can have on those living with SCI every day. According to the National Spinal Cord Injury Association, "every 48 seconds in America, a person becomes paralyzed." This can occur from motor vehicle accidents, sports injuries, falls, and more.

You may already know that our founder Todd Brown was injured in a motocross accident and is paralyzed from the chest down. This accident is what eventually led him to create our company, so the cause is, of course, near and dear to our hearts here at 180 Medical. We also have employees on staff who have been affected by spinal cord injuries.

According to a recent study by the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, there are approximately 1,275,000 people living with spinal cord injuries, so chances are that you or someone you may know has been directly or indirectly affected. You're not alone.

We invite you to share this post to help spread awareness of spinal cord injuries to your friends and family.

Visit the links below for more resources.

  • Christopher & Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center -- Request a free copy of their comprehensive Paralysis Resource Guide and get access to informative videos, facts, local resources. There are options to donate, join Team Reeve, and get involved in raising awareness.
  • National Spinal Cord Injury Association -- Join NSCA's United Spinal Team Advocacy to work for change, stay in the know on upcoming events and the latest news, and access local chapters and support groups. You can also find publications, advocacy brochures, handrims for your wheelchair, and more in their online store. 
  • The Buoniconti Fund -- A non-profit organization committed to finding a cure for paralysis from spinal cord injury. Stay up to date on the latest news and events, donate, and find support and resources.
  • Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) -- An organization dedicated specifically to United States Military service members and veterans who are paralyzed. Find news, information, and local chapters for support.
  • United Spinal Association -- This organization is dedicated to providing support and enhancing quality of life for those with spinal cord injuries. Find resources, support from peers and your community, counseling for veterans, ways to get involved and donate, and more.
  • Travis Roy Foundation -- Stay up to date on recent research, find volunteer opportunities, donate, and find other ways to get involved.
  • Apparelyzed forums -- Meet others who are dealing with various issues related to spinal cord injuries and/or paralyzation in an online forum. Connect with their Facebook page for additional peer support and networking.


180 medical jessAbout the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 5 years and currently holds the title of Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company.
 

National Spinal Cord Injury Month

by kier September 1 2011 15:07
September has been named National Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month. At 180 Medical, we always spend time to help educate and provide peer mentoring for those who have experienced spinal cord injuries and their families. It's the reason Todd Brown started our company. He wanted to help others like him experience the products and service they deserved.

We'd like to take a moment to share a few great resources we've run into this month.

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation
The Reeve Foundation is dedicated to curing spinal cord injury by funding innovative research, and improving the quality of life for people living with paralysis through grants, information and advocacy.

A great list of events around the U.S. Search by state to find events in your area to get involved with.

FacingDisability.com is designed to provide videos and support for people with spinal cord injuries and the members of their families. Connecting with the life experiences of others who have been down the path ahead of you often helps people find their own strength and support.

An extensive list of phone applications put together by the Reeve Foundation for those living with paralysis.

Life Rolls On
Life Rolls On, a subsidiary of the Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, is dedicated to improving the quality of life for young people affected by spinal cord injury and utilizes action sports as a platform to inspire infinite possibilities despite paralysis.

CONTINUE
An amazing video proving there are no limits to the things you can do after spinal cord injury. Shows those with spinal cord injuries participating in 28 different sports. A must see!

National Spinal Cord Injury Association
NSCIA helps educate and empower survivors of spinal cord injury and disease to achieve and maintain the highest levels of independence, health and personal fulfillment. 

Life in Action
New publication to empower Americans with spinal cord injuries and disorders with active-lifestyle information, peer connection and advocacy. Life in Action is the membership publication of the National Spinal Cord Injury Association, a program of United Spinal Association.

SPORTS 'N SPOKES
Is a publication that delivers exciting content to the wheelchair sports and recreation community.

TravelinWheels
A wonderful resource that provides detailed accessibility information about destinations for travelers with disabilities.

Challenged Athletes Foundation
CAF provides opportunities and support to people with physical disabilities so they can pursue active lifestyles through physical fitness and competitive athletics.