Toll-Free(877) 688-2729
 

Spina Bifida Won't Stop Frank's Goals to Become a Phys Ed Teacher

by Jessica November 3 2017 13:53


Earlier this year, we were proud to announce the seven 2017 180 Medical College Scholarship recipients. Our scholarship program was first established by 180 Medical's founder, Todd Brown, and since that time five years ago, we have worked hard to maintain his vision by being diligent and careful as we read through all the many inspiring essays and applications sent in each year. It's never easy to narrow it down to just seven finalists, but we're positive this year's scholarship awards are awarded to some amazing students who are ready to make their mark on the world.

Last month, we introduced the first of our 2017 recipients, Megha. This week, meet Frank! 

frank damiani spina bifida career goals quote

Growing Up With Spina Bifida

Frank has had a lot of battles to fight since the day he was born with Spina Bifida. From the moment he arrived in the world, he needed immediate surgery on the sac on his back and the exposed muscles and nerves of his spine, but Frank says his mother has been there for him every step of the way as a big motivator.

"My mom worked hard to help my disability become a way of life and not a big deal." She was even the reason he originally got involved in his true passion: Shotokan Karate back in 2007.

Finding a Passion for Martial Arts

The karate instructor speaks incredibly highly of Frank in regards to his extraordinary character and his "overwhelming desire to learn and expand his knowledge by participating in any extracurricular events, such as clinics or tournaments that may aid in his growth as both an individual and a Martial Artist."

Every day, whether at school or practicing karate, he shows a passion and spirit that not many can match, and because of his dedication to his practice, Frank is now a black belt and still practices this form of martial arts at least four times a week. He says that it is a huge part of why he felt he was able to grow stronger and become self-disciplined. 

One of his favorite things to do is volunteer to mentor younger students where he practices karate. His extraordinary kindness, willingness to listen, and patience what really stand out about Frank to the children he teaches who may have special needs or disabilities. According to his karate instructor, "Frank is loved and respected by all of the students and parents with whom he comes into contact, likely because he gives all of himself to assisting his classmates and has a true passion for whatever goals he pursues." 

frank karate spina bifidaNeedless to say, we here at 180 Medical are truly impressed by Frank's dedication. He's a student that represents so many aspects of the characteristics our company aspires to achieve every day in what we do through his compassion, integrity, and his willingness to serve others. 

Turning a Passion into a Career

In fact, that is a big part of Frank's ultimate career goal, which he is working toward now at Kingsborough Community College. He is working toward becoming a Physical Education teacher for the Department of Education, and he wants to work with children with Spina Bifida, spinal cord injuries, and other physical challenges that keep them from being able to attend regular gym class in school. 

Frank says, "I love being a role model to younger students. It makes me feel good, and I believe teaching will give me the same satisfaction."

Frank, everyone at 180 Medical is rooting for you to keep moving forward toward achieving your goals. We know that thanks to your dedication and kindness, you will surely positively affect other children by showing them that sports and physical activities don't have to be off limits just because of a disability or a physical challenge. Good luck in your first semester of school! 

About the 180 Medical Scholarship

We hope you enjoy reading a little bit about each of this year's scholarship recipients throughout the coming months as we feature them on our blog and our social media accounts. Feel free to check out past year's recipients on our blog. Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter to stay updated on this and many more fun company events, educational topics, awareness, careers at 180 Medical, and more! 

180 Medical is honored to be able to offer a scholarship program each year to help students living with spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, transverse myelitis, ostomies (ileostomy, urostomy, and/or colostomy), and/or a neurogenic bladder. College costs are a lot to manage on their own, but we know there are often extra financial burdens on aspiring students who live with these medical conditions, so that's why 180 Medical created this program.

Find out more details at our Scholarship page, and watch for coming announcements about the 2018 180 Medical College Scholarship later this year.

2018 college scholarship sci spina bifida

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years and is the Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for a company that truly cares both for its employees and its customers.

 

Megha's Experience with Spina Bifida Influences Her Future Goals

by Jessica October 11 2017 05:50
meet megha 2017 180 medical scholarship recipient

On August 1st, we officially announced the seven 2017 180 Medical College Scholarship recipients. Since 2012, when our scholarship program was first established by our founder, Todd Brown, we have been diligent in taking care and time to read through all of the amazing essays sent in by our applicants. As always, it was difficult for our Scholarship Committee to narrow it down to just seven people in the end, as there are so many inspiring students ready to make their impact on the world, but we are so proud to be able to offer this well-deserved scholarship award to the finalists.

Today, meet Megha, the first of our 2017 recipients to be featured on our blog!

megha kalyan spina bifida scholarship

Megha was born with Spina Bifida, which is one of the most common neural tube defects at birth. According to the CDC, about 1,500 babies are born each year with spina bifida. Spina Bifida doesn't present exactly the same conditions in every single person, depending upon the severity. In Megha's case, she was undiagnosed for nearly a year and a half before her parents found out that she had Spina Bifida. Because of their great love for their daughter, they left everything they had ever known in India after her diagnosis and immigrated to the United States to get the best medical care for Megha.
megha spina bifida
Despite having a condition that requires her to use crutches and ankle-foot orthotics, Megha says that her parents kept their expectations high for her in every aspect. Through their guidance and her experiences at school, she came to a realization that "the only obstacles that really mattered were the obstacles I created in my mind." Even with 3 major surgeries that kept her out of school for months each time, she never let it hold her back from her biggest goal: working toward a career in medicine. 

A huge influence on Megha's life and her decision to pursue a career as a doctor was her Pediatric Orthopedic surgeon. "I was always amazed how he had the ability to give children a much better quality of life," Megha says. That combined with his clear dedication to perfection in surgery as well as the way he treated her really contributed to narrowing down her career choice.

As she works toward that goal, majoring in Biology with focus on pre-med, she keeps a set of clear goals for herself to meet before finally graduating and moving on to medical school. She also wants to join the Peace Corps, because she has a dream to help other young children living with disabilities in other countries.

megha graduates 2017 spina bifida scholarshipMegha's drive to succeed is truly impressive, but we're especially moved by her dedication to use her career and her experiences to help and heal others.

Good luck in your first semester of school at the University of Virginia, Megha! We're excited to see how you will positively impact the world in the future!

We hope you enjoy reading a little bit about each of this year's scholarship recipients throughout the coming months as we feature them on our blog and our social media accounts. Feel free to check out past year's recipients on our blog. Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter to stay updated on this and many more fun company events, educational topics, awareness, careers at 180 Medical, and more! 

180 Medical is honored to be able to offer a scholarship program each year to help students living with spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, transverse myelitis, ostomies (ileostomy, urostomy, and/or colostomy), and/or a neurogenic bladder. College costs are a lot to manage on their own, but we know there are often extra financial burdens on aspiring students who live with these medical conditions, so that's why 180 Medical created this program. Find out more details at our Scholarship page, and watch for coming announcements about the 2018 180 Medical College Scholarship later this year.

Did you know that October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month?

spina bifida awareness month

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years and is the Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for a company that truly cares both for its employees and its customers.

 

What to Know About Folic Acid Awareness Week

by Jessica January 10 2017 19:42


January 8th through the 14th of this year is National Folic Acid Awareness Week, and we encourage all of our customers and readers of our blog to mark the dates on their calendars. If you want to take it a step further, share this post with your friends and family to help raise awareness. Folic acid is a vitamin that every person needs, but it is especially important for women who are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant. With that in mind, here are a few notes about folic acid and its importance.

What is Folic Acid?

healthy pregnancy with folic acidFolic acid is an essential B vitamin the body needs to produce new cells. This is helpful for fetal development in the womb, but many others also take it for cardiovascular, brain, and nervous system support. 

Folate and folic acid are the same thing; folic acid is just the man-made version. You can get an adequate amount of folic acid in most pre-natal vitamins, but you can also get folate naturally in certain food sources, such as:

  • Lentils
  • Dark green vegetables such as spinach, turnip greens, or asparagus
  • Beans (pinto, garbanzo, black, kidney, and more)
  • Cruciferous veggies like broccoli

What Birth Defects Could Be Caused by a Lack of Folic Acid?

There are primarily two:

1. Spina Bifida is a life-long condition which occurs when the neural tube doesn't completely close while in the womb, leaving the spinal cord often unprotected, depending on the severity of the condition. This can result in paralysis or poor limb function, neurogenic bladder and bowel issues, muscle weakness, and more.
2. Anencephaly is another condition associated with a lack of folic acid, which ultimately causes death because the brain does not completely form.

The CDC says that an adequate amount of folic acid could reduce the chances of having these birth defects by as much as 70%.

How Much Folic Acid Is Needed?

Pregnant women or women who are trying to get pregnant should aim for at least 400 micrograms of folate or folic acid at least a month before getting pregnant and every day during pregnancy. The easiest way to achieve this is by taking a pre-natal multivitamin supplement, although folate can also be taken in through natural food sources, such as the examples listed above. 

For more information about Spina Bifida, visit us at 180medical.com today.

Tips for Prevention of Birth Defects

by Jessica January 4 2017 12:51
tips for prevention of birth defects blog header

January is National Birth Defects Prevention Month, which was created to raise awareness of birth defects and educate the public on potential causes as well as prevention and treatment options. 1 in 33 babies born in the United States will have a birth defect of some kind. To put things in perspective, this means that every four and a half minutes, a baby is born with a birth defect. 

Birth defects are caused by problems in how organs and body parts form while the fetus develops in the womb. There are more than 4,000 different kinds of birth defects out there, including structural heart issues as well as spina bifida. Spina Bifida, for example, is one common condition which can require the use of catheters to go to the bathroom. Spina Bifida's effects can range from mild to as severe as causing some paralyzation, limited mobility, and even a neurogenic bladder (which can cause urinary incontinence and retention).

Tips to Lessen Risk of Birth Defects

It's not possible to prevent the risk of every possible birth defect, unfortunately. That being said, here are a few tips that may help maximize the chances of having a healthy baby:

  • Take a Folate/Folic Acid Supplement: Low folate levels have been linked to birth defects. Those who plan to become pregnant should aim for at least 400 micrograms of folate every day, starting a month before pregnancy and every day during pregnancy.
  • Get Prenatal Care as Soon as Possible: This will ensure that any potential medical issues are caught early on, and you can get the care and information you need to maintain a healthy pregnancy. Your healthcare professional can advise you best on the right nutrition and exercises during the stages of your pregnancy.
  • Avoid Alcohol and Tobacco: These can greatly increase the risk of birth defects. Consult with your healthcare professional on which prescription medications you can continue throughout your pregnancy. 
  • Stay Healthy for You and Your Baby: Prevent infections by avoiding being around people who are sick, and be sure to keep your hands well-washed, especially before and after preparing foods. Seek medical care for any issues of concern. 

For more information, visit the National Birth Defects Prevention Network. Their website offers preventative tips, printable brochures and posters, as well as helpful resources.

2016 180 Medical College Scholarship Recipients: Focus on Spencer

by Jessica October 27 2016 10:07
Earlier this summer, we announced the names of each of the 2016 180 Medical College Scholarship recipients. This year, there were so many deserving candidates with inspirational backstories and exciting goals, whether to be able to return to school after a long absence in hopes to renew a career path or just starting out as a college freshman with dreams of being able to help others with their future job. We are truly honored to be able to help these seven students get a little closer to their goals. 

We will continue to feature each one of our recipients on our blog, so sign up for our newsletter so you can get notified every time we publish a new blog. Previously, we have featured MacyJared, and Tiffany. This week, meet Spencer!

spencer h 2016 180 medical college scholarship quote


spencer wheelchair basketballSpencer was born with Spina Bifida, but he feels that his parents helped him from the beginning to see his own potential. They kept him signed up for sports where he played along side able-bodied children, and then later he found an even greater joy in wheelchair basketball.

"Wheelchair basketball began to open doors for me that I never thought possible," Spencer says. "I could compete like I always wanted to, [and] I had friends who were just as determined as I was to succeed despite limitations."

After his freshman year of college, Spencer served as a full-time missionary for two years and then returned to school to continue his sophomore year. While he focuses hard on maintaining his high GPA, he also makes time to hold a leadership position at his local church group on campus and is also proud to be a member of the University of Illinois men's wheelchair basketball team. 

As of this fall semester, Spencer is in his junior year of college, pursuing a degree in Integrative Biology. He has an optimistic, determined spirit, and we wish Spencer all the best as he continues to work toward his goals in life. 

180 Medical is honored to offer an annual scholarship program to help those with spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, transverse myelitis, ostomies (ileostomy, urostomy, and/or colostomy), and/or a neurogenic bladder. We know paying for college isn't easy these days, and we also understand that there can often be extra financial difficulties for aspiring students who live with these conditions. That's why we created this program. To learn more about our annual College Scholarship, visit our Scholarship page

Did you know that October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month? Learn more:

spina bifida awareness month footer

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 7 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company. 

 

Spina Bifida Awareness Month

by Jessica October 24 2016 10:59
spina bifida awareness month 180 medical

October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month, which was created to bring public attention to the condition, how it affects those living with it (as well as their families), possible causes, potential treatments, and resources for support and education. 

infant with spina bifida
Spina Bifida is one of the most common birth defects in the world, and this occurs when the neural tube doesn't fully develop or close properly while still in the womb. Spina Bifida has a variety of effects, ranging from a birthmark all the way to paralysis, depending on how mild or severe the condition is. Other symptoms may include:
  • Difficulty walking or total inability to walk
  • Little to no feeling in extremities/limbs, particularly legs and feet
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Scoliosis
  • Bladder and bowel issues, particularly retention or incontinence
Doctors aren't sure what exactly causes Spina Bifida, but they believe that it could be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Treatment varies with the severity of the condition. In cases of meningocele and myelomeningocele, surgery is required. A child affected by Spina Bifida may require ongoing care, and they may need to use intermittent catheters as well in order to manage bladder issues. 

Celebrating Those Who Live With Spina Bifida

Spina Bifida doesn't have to mean a child will not be able to achieve great things and go on to live a full life. Six-time Chicago marathon champion and Paralympic track athlete Tatyana McFadden who lives with Spina Bifida was recently featured on Ellen (Ellen DeGeneres' television show), where she discussed some of her struggles. Tatyana grew up in an orphanage in Russia. Because of her condition, which left her paralyzed from the waist down, she was often passed over by potential adoptive families. 

Finally, at the age of six, she was adopted and moved to Maryland with her new family. Her adoptive parents encouraged her to get into sports and more physical activity to stay healthy, and she said this is what changed her life. 

Today, with hard work, determination, and a positive outlook, Tatyana has become the fastest wheelchair racer of all time, and she has earned seven gold medals. In addition to that, she has won all four major marathons for wheelchair racing -- the Boston, Chicago, London, and New York marathons. No racer has ever achieved this before. She has even met the President and First Lady of the United States. 

Tatyana has proven that it is possible to achieve amazing things, despite the odds, and one can live a healthy, accomplished life with Spina Bifida. Her story can bring awareness about this condition as well as hope to others who live with this condition. 

Learn more about Spina Bifida and October as SB Awareness Month by visiting the Spina Bifida Association website.

spina bifida awareness month

Is Your Child Ready to Learn to Self-Cath?

by Jessica October 21 2016 09:59
is your child ready to learn to self cath blog header

We here at 180 Medical empathize with the concerns you may have as a parent of a child that has a condition which requires them to use catheters to drain their bladder and stay healthy. For example, Spina Bifida is one of the more common conditions that affects children as young as newborns.

While you may be in charge of your child's prescribed intermittent catheterization routine for their first formative years, you may wonder when is the right time or age for them to learn to self-cath on their own. Rest assured that there are kids as young as 5 years old that successfully self-cath daily. So reaching a certain age is actually not as important as a few other major factors that can show you they are ready to self-catheterize, such as reliability and responsibility, as well as a pro-active expression for more independence and wanting to learn to intermittently catheterize on their own. 

Activities to Test If Your Child is Ready to Learn Self-Catheterization

spina bifida child in wheelchair

Louisa Salvin, an RN at in the Pediatric Urology Department at SSM Cardinal Glennon Medical Center, has graciously provided the below information that may help you determine if your child with is physically ready to begin self-cathing.

"Certain physical and mental abilities are required in order to successfully learn to do self-catherization. Try these different activities to determine if your child may be ready to learn:

  • Hold a pencil with a pincer grasp and do up and down strokes.
  • Thread a shoelace.
  • With eyes closed, feel a hole and place a peg in it.
  • With your child watching you, place three objects in a bag. Do something else for a few minutes. Then have the child tell you what's in the bag and in what order the objects were placed in the bag."

Tips For Successful Self-Catheterization for Kids

If your child seems ready to start using catheters all on their own, the next step is to make sure they have all the materials and information they need to continue their self-cathing routine on their own while maintaining proper hygiene and privacy.

Here are a few helpful tips:

  • There's no need for a sense of urgency about it; the process of transitioning from you cathing your child to them cathing on their own can take time. This is completely fine to ease slowly into it. Some find going step by step to be helpful, so that your child can remember every part of the process to make sure their catheterization routine is done hygienically and correctly each time.
  • Consider setting alarms on a smartphone or a watch similar to these options that are able to set multiple alarms during the day according to your child's prescribed catheterization regimen. These can remind you and your child both when it's time to cath. 
  • Have the catheter supplies on hand and ready to go. Depending on the catheter type your child uses, make sure you have all the necessary accessories, such as additional lubricant, gloves to fit their hands, antiseptic wipes, and a good amount of catheter supplies on hand for the day. For your kids who are ready to go to school or plan to go on a trip, having an all-in-one kit like a closed system catheter can really make a difference in ease of use.kids club washing hands
  • Make sure your child is reliable in washing their hands before and after cathing to reduce any risk of a urinary tract infection or
    spreading germs. 
  • Watch for the signs of a UTI. Especially when they are first learning the process of how to properly cath, it's important to watch for symptoms such as pain, burning, blood or sediment in the urine output, an increased urgency or frequency, or a fever. If symptoms of a UTI begin to occur, contact your child's doctor as soon as possible. 
  • Be supportive and patient as your child learns on their own. Even as you begin to back off and let them take the reins for their own health, positive encouragement and making sure they follow their catheterization schedule is crucial to their success.
  • A great starting point for your child will be to sign up for the 180 Medical Kids Club. This awesome program was created just for you and your child to begin adjusting to the new process of independently cathing. Right off the bat, you will receive a drawstring backpack filled with one-of-a-kind educational materials and activities, along with a few additional fun surprises, and your child can begin learning more about Ethan & Emma, 180 Medical’s own storybook characters who have Spina Bifida and can help emphasize the normality and ease of using catheters in everyday life. The Kids’ Club also helps teach how to use intermittent catheters correctly to reduce the chance of infection. Click here to sign your child up for the Kids Club today! 

Keep in mind that each situation and condition is as unique as the individual who needs catheters, so please consult with your child's prescribing healthcare professional to determine if they believe your child is ready to use catheters on their own and what type of catheter may be best for their needs. You can view our selection of pediatric catheters here.

If you have any other questions or would like more information, feel free to contact our friendly, highly-trained specialists. 180 Medical is a respected national supplier of intermittent catheters and related supplies, and we are here to help you and your child find the best intermittent catheters for their needs. 

180 medical kids club blog footer

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 7 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company. 

 

2016 180 Medical College Scholarship Recipients: Focus on Tiffany

by Jessica October 5 2016 10:48
Earlier this summer, we were proud to be able to announce the names of each of our 2016 College Scholarship recipients. This year, there were so many deserving candidates with inspirational backstories and exciting goals, whether to be able to return to school after a long absence in hopes to renew a career path or just starting out as a college freshman with dreams of being able to help others with their future job. We are honored to be able to help these seven students get a little closer to their goals. 

Throughout the following months, we will continue to feature each one of our recipients on our blog, so sign up for our newsletter so you can get notified every time we publish a new blog. Previously, we have featured Macy and Jared. This week, meet Tiffany!

tiffany m 180 medical college scholarship recipient 2016
Tiffany was born with Spina Bifida, and she is no stranger to questions about her disability. But her answer is always the same: "I was born with a disability for a purpose." Tiffany feels that, despite the odds, she was given this challenge in life to help her learn and grow to be a better person. tiffany m with familyWhile it made growing up difficult at times, and she has been through multiple surgeries, which are never easy, Tiffany has maintained a sense of optimism and determination that defies the odds. 

"I never quit trying something new," Tiffany says. "I hope to be an inspiration to a young girl who wishes she could dance but thinks she cannot or a young boy who wants to play football but thinks he will never be able to."

As of the beginning of the fall semester, Tiffany has begun her first semester of college at the University of North Alabama and is planning on a major in Exercise Science. Her ultimate goal is to pursue a career in pediatric physical therapy, so that she can help children with their disabilities as well as hoping to keep them optimistic too. 

We are sure that Tiffany will continue her impressive forward momentum in life and positively affect others' lives with her story and her future career. 

180 Medical is honored to offer an annual scholarship program to help those with spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, transverse myelitis, ostomies (ileostomy, urostomy, and/or colostomy), and/or a neurogenic bladder. We know paying for college isn't easy these days, and we also understand that there can often be extra financial difficulties for aspiring students who live with these conditions. That's why we created this program. To learn more about our annual College Scholarship, visit our Scholarship page

Did you know that October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month? Learn more:

spina bifida awareness month footer

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 7 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company. 

 

Spina Bifida Awareness Month

by Jessica October 8 2015 08:06
Each year, we take time to let the public know that October is Spina Bifida Awareness Month, a condition that affects more than 100,000 people across the globe. Spina bifida occurs in 3,000 pregnancies per year, and there are 65 million women who are susceptible of giving birth to a child with spina bifida every year. In fact, every day 8 children will be born with spina bifida. According to the latest statistics, approximately 166,000 people currently live with some form of this condition. 

What is the Cause of Spina Bifida

At this time, the cause of spina bifida is relatively unknown, but researchers believe that it lies within some combination of genetic and environmental factors. One of the most supported theories is that a lack of folate (folic acid) intake during pregnancy can increase the likelihood of spina bifida. Additionally, mothers who give birth to one child with the condition have a slightly increased chance of giving birth to another child with some form of spina bifida as well. 

spina bifida example on infantSpina bifida occurs when the spinal column of the fetus does not close completely while developing in the womb. Normally, the neural tube forms in the first few weeks of pregnancy and should close completely by the 28th day. In children born with spina bifida, the neural tube either didn't form correctly or close completely, causing a sac of fluid to leak onto the spinal column, damaging it. There are several forms of spina bifida, including spina bifida occulta, meningocele, and myelomeningocele (which is considered the most severe form of the disease). 

Living with Spina Bifida

Living with spina bifida will depend upon the severity of the condition, as well as the location of the lesion. For example, in the mildest form, it may not even be known right away that the child has the condition, unless they get an x-ray of the area for another reason. Usually, they won't exhibit any symptoms of neurological problems. They may have a physical indication, like a collection of fat or hair in the area, but that's about it. 

However, those living with myelomeningocele will have obvious symptoms. Tissues and nerves may be exposed, damaging them and causing a host of symptoms. Neurological problems can occur as well as paralysis, bladder and bowel problems, seizures, and more. 

While spina bifida can be life-altering, it doesn't mean that those inflicted with spina bifida can't live a long, successful life. Modern medicine and emerging technologies have enabled patients to live longer and more healthily. Before the second half of the 20th century, most babies born with the condition actually died. Today, 90% will survive childbirth and go on into adulthood. Surgeries right after childbirth can help to close the spinal column and minimize the risk of infection. 

The symptoms of spina bifida will remain, and it is up to the family and the patient's team of doctors to provide the support and tools necessary for the child to deal with the symptoms of the condition. Urinary catheter supplies can help with bladder issues, and physical therapy and exercises can strengthen the child's muscles, whether they are in a chair or learning to walk with braces or crutches. 

We feel it's important to make more people aware of spina bifida, the risk factors, symptoms, and treatments available, as well as hopefully moving forward research to find a cure. 

For more information about Spina Bifida, please visit www.180medical.com/spina-bifida.

spina bifida awareness footer

Time to Apply for 180 Medical's 2015 College Scholarship Program

by Jessica January 28 2015 13:24
Are you seeking financial assistance to help pay for your full-time college hours in the Fall of 2015?  Up until June 1st of this year, eligible applicants can apply for one of seven awards. Learn more: