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Tips for Going Back to School with Catheters

by Jessica August 27 2018 05:52
going back to school catheters tips

If your child has begun to self-catheterize all on their own, you're probably very proud of their big step. However, as they go back to school this fall, you may also have some concerns and questions about their transition to self-cathing at school.

For example, will your child be able to discreetly carry and use their catheters? Can they store all their needed catheter supplies at school? Will they be able to self-cath in a public restroom without getting a urinary tract infection? 

Those questions are perfectly understandable, and we want to help.

Here are some of the top tips for preparing your child to self-cath on their own at school, including advice from pediatric urology nurses who work with kids who cath every day.


Tips for Preparing to Self-Cath at School

1. Plan in advance, and visit the school with your child.

Schedule a time to visit your child's school, and speak with their teacher, school nurse, and any other necessary school administrators.

Some of the topics to discuss may include:

  • your child's condition & their requirement of catheter to drain their bladder
  • the need for discretion and privacy
  • available storage options at the school

teacher at schoolThe teacher will typically make reasonable accommodations, like allowing bathroom breaks at particular times of the day so your child can empty their bladder according to their doctor's prescribed intermittent cathing schedule.

Be aware that a doctor's note will likely be required for any related requests like this.

Andrea Brown, RN of Pediatric Urology at OUHSC, advises to "keep backup catheters with a teacher or office staff away from their regular supply, just in case their daily stash gets low or runs out."

The school will probably have an option to store your child's backup catheter supply in lockable storage, like a private closet, locker, or in the school nurse's office. This way, if your child ever happens to use more catheters than usual during the day, you can both rest assured that there will be additional stock always on hand for them.

You will also want to make sure your child understands and can follow their prescribed self-cathing schedule.

A good way to set reminders is on a programmable watch or even on their phone. If your child has trouble remembering when to cath and doesn't have an option for setting reminders, let the teacher know what times of day or when your child should take a short break to go to the restroom and catheterize.


set pediatric cathing reminders for your child



2. Find a discreet way for your child to carry and dispose of their catheter supplies.

back to school catheters backpackThe scariest part of heading back to school as a child who caths is worrying about what others might think if they find out, so of course, it's natural to want to keep their need for self-cathing private.

The good news is that there are plenty of options for privately carrying catheter supplies in public. Angela Harting, Lead LPN at OU Physicians Pediatric Urology, suggests options for keeping catheter supplies discreet like "a makeup case, backpack, or eyeglasses case."

Andrea Brown suggests wearing clothes with pockets and, "if possible, use pocket-sized catheters."

"Most kids use a cinch bag to keep their supplies in," says Brandi Capps, RN and BSN at Duke Pediatric Urology. "Using hydrophilic catheters are also helpful, so they don't have to keep track of so many supplies."

If your child's restroom at school does not have trash receptacles in the stalls where they can quickly and easily throw away their pediatric cathing supplies, they'll have to use the main trash can in the restroom, usually located near the sinks. This doesn't mean that their privacy has to be compromised. Simply provide them with the amount of disposal bags they would need along with their daily supplies. Some find that simple brown paper lunch bags do the trick.

Some closed system catheters include a separate bag for discreet disposal. Ask our Product Specialists about which options might be right for your child.

For more ideas, check out our blog "10 Ways to Carry Your Catheter Supplies Discreetly."



3. Discuss maintaining proper hygiene with your child.

washing hands before cathingAbove all else, "washing their hands is key," says Brandi Capps. Talk to your child about the importance of washing their hands with antibacterial soap and warm water before and after self-cathing to reduce the risk of infection

Angela Harting also advises that your child should carry hand sanitizer in their pocket, backpack, or other tote for quick and easy hand-cleaning when water and soap aren't available.



4. Make sure your child knows what to do in an emergency. 

As a parent or caregiver of a child with special needs, you probably know what to do in case of an emergency. However, at school, your child will need to know how to reach out for help in certain situations. 

in case of emergencyAngela Harting advises that in case of any minor emergency, let your child know to "go to their teacher, their school nurse, or other trained staff while at school." She says it's also important that they know how to call you or another trusted family member or caregiver in case of small emergencies, like running out of supplies too soon in the day.

She also says to remember that your child's doctor and/or pediatric urology team is just a phone call away.

180 Medical is here for you as well, especially in the case of catheter product questions, supply refills, and other related needs.

As always, in any serious medical emergency, their teacher should call 911. 



5. Try an advanced pediatric catheter.

There are plenty of benefits to using an advanced pediatric catheter, like a hydrophilics or closed systems. Many of these benefits apply to the above tips, especially regarding discretion, ease of use and storage, and hygiene to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections.

However, it's important to make sure your child is comfortable with using their new catheter product and have used it on their own at home with your supervision, if necessary, before bringing it to school to use on their own. 

Hydrophilic catheters almost always include an adhesive tab on the back of the package to press and hang on the wall securely, rather than having to put it on the floor or trying to juggle all their supplies. With hydrophilic catheters, there is often considerably less mess and less supplies to worry about, which means they're easier to carry and pocket. 

hydrophilic catheter illustration 180 medical

Closed system catheters are considered "all-in-one" catheters, because along with a hydrophilic or pre-lubricated catheter, the package also contains insertion supplies, such as antibacterial wipes, an underpad, gloves, and even a collection bag for easy drainage. Most brands also feature a soft, flexible introducer tip that is pre-lubricated, and this tip helps the catheter tube itself to bypass the highest concentrations of bacteria on the outside and in the first few millimeters of your child's urethra. This can have a positive impact on reducing the risk of infection.

closed system catheter illustration

Both hydrophilic catheters and closed system catheters are essentially "touch-free," thanks to options like gripping sleeves that can help your child manipulate the catheter without ever having to touch the tube itself. This may reduce the risk of contamination from hands.


6. Check out the 180 Medical Kids Club.

By joining the 180 Medical Kids Club, your child will receive a free drawstring bag filled with some fun activities that help normalize the idea of self-cathing for children.

180 medical kids club bag ethan emmaPerfect for carrying catheters and other lightweight school supplies discreetly, each bag includes a colorful book for both girls and boys with a story highlighting two characters, Ethan and Emma, who have Spina Bifida and self-cath. In this fun illustrated story, your child can learn that cathing all on their own is important for keeping them healthy and increasing their independence.

If your child is still in the process of learning how to self-cath on their own, the kit also includes catheter guides for children, as well as step-by-step information that will help them learn how to perform self-catheterization (whether they are cathing through their urethra or a stoma).

Still unsure if your child is ready to self-catheterize? Read our blog post to find out how to know if they are able and ready to start cathing on their own. This way you and your child can feel more confident as they start their new journey of learning pediatric catheter insertion

Check out the 180 Medical Kids Club today! 


180 Medical Is Here for Your Pediatric Catheter Supply Needs

For more information about catheter supplies that can help make your child's cathing routine easier, more hygienic, and discreet, reach out to our live online chat option at www.180medical.com during business hours or call us toll-free at 1-877-688-2729.

Our Product Specialists will be happy to discuss any other questions or concerns you may have, and they can suggest and sample options of catheters that may fit your child's lifestyle and needs while keeping their need for catheterization discreet.

Good luck to you and your child in the new school year!



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jessica 180 medical blog authorAbout the Author:

Jessica is the Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator, & she has been with 180 Medical for 9 years. To her, the best part of working at 180 Medical is the opportunity to truly make a difference in peoples' lives. In her downtime, she enjoys creative writing, seeing new places, & spending time with her loved ones & her dogs. 

Tips for Cathing After Prostate Cancer Surgery

by Jessica July 13 2018 06:23
tips for catheterization after prostate cancer surgery


Each year, nearly 165,000 males in the United States are diagnosed with prostate cancer.

early detection and prevention of prostate cancerProstate cancer is the most common cancer in men other than skin cancer, and it is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men according to the American Cancer Society.

However, this slow-growing cancer is often very treatable and isn't necessarily fatal, particularly in cases where it is diagnosed early. This is why it's so important to make regular or annual appointments to see a urologist. Early detection is key.


Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Surgery

For those who are diagnosed with prostate cancer, there are a few treatment options. This will entirely depend on how severe the cancer growth is. The best course of action will come down to a mutual decision between you and your treating physician. 

Some may have to undergo a partial or full removal of the prostate by surgery, which is called a prostatectomy. This procedure is done to prevent the diseased portions or all of this walnut-sized gland from the body in order to prevent the cancer from spreading.

prostate cancer surgeryWhile it is considered a safe operation and usually very successful, there can be some side effects. According to the UCLA Prostate Cancer Program, “the surgery may weaken the muscles that control your urine flow. Surgery may also hurt the nerves that help control your bladder.” This is why some men occasionally experience urine leakage or symptoms of a neurogenic bladder after the surgery. In many cases, this side effect is temporary, but for some, this could be a long-term condition that requires treatment as well.

Depending on the symptoms and the severity, a protective undergarment or adult briefs may be a good option to absorb any leakage until the symptoms subside.

However, in other cases, it may be best to use an intermittent catheter to help empty the bladder and prevent urine leakage.


Tips for New Catheter Users After Prostate Cancer Surgery

Find the right intermittent Catheter for you.

You're unique, and so are your needs and preferences. That's why it's important to remember that no single type or brand of catheter is the best choice for everyone across the board. 

There are multiple types of disposable catheters available on the market today, so you have plenty of product options from which to choose. When it's time to begin selecting an intermittent catheter that will work best for you, be sure to consult with your prescribing healthcare professional to determine together what may work best for you, taking into account your lifestyle, preferences, medical condition, and anatomy. 

Straight intermittent catheters are considered the original technology. This type of catheter is uncoated and must be manually lubricated with separate lubricating jelly before insertion. Lubrication is typically sold separately in easy-to-open options like single-use travel-size packets or capped tubes. These are a simple catheter option, and some men prefer these due to their overall affordability and practicality.


straight caths for men


Hydrophilic catheters can be a great option, especially for those new to self-cathing, because of their convenience, sterility, and travel-readiness. Hydrophilic catheters have a coating that becomes slippery when activated by water and takes the place of typical lubricating jelly to make catheterization more smooth and comfortable. 


hydrophilic catheters for men


Closed system catheters are also great for sterile, no-touch cathing. Frequent travelers and those in wheelchairs also find closed systems to be incredibly handy and often easier to maneuver than standard straight catheters, since they are all-in-one systems with integrated collection bags. These often come with additional insertion supplies like ambidextrous gloves, antiseptic wipes, and other accessories to keep the cathing process hygienic.


closed system catheters for men


If you have any issues with inserting a straight tip, your doctor may recommend that you use a curved tip catheter known as a coudé catheter. Coudé catheters may help maneuver through tight spaces in the urethra like strictures and get past blockages.

Coudé tips are offered along with straight tips in every type of catheter listed above. Availability will depending on the brand and French size needed. 


keep it hygienic to reduce your risk of infection

Urinary tract infections are a common side effect among those who self-cath. There are ways to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections, such as using a touch-free catheter like a hydrophilic catheter or closed system catheter.

Do your best to keep your hands off the catheter tube to prevent contamination, and maintain a sterile environment.

On top of that, using your intermittent catheter just once and then disposing of it is a great way to reduce your risk of urinary tract infections.


talk to your doctor and follow their instructions.

Be sure to pay close attention to your doctors’ and nurses’ instructions regarding catheter use, including how frequently to catheterize per day and whether or not you should record your urine output for a period of time.

There are many misconceptions about cathing, which is why you should always be attentive and upfront with any questions to ensure you fully understand how to cath correctly. 


urologist prostate


Consider your catheter supplier options carefully.

Not all medical supply companies are equal when it comes to their brand selection, customer service, or product knowledge.

If you are asking “Where can I buy catheters?,” consider 180 Medical, the leading intermittent catheter supplier in the nation.

180 Medical offers an wide and varied selection of male length catheters from all of the top brands and manufacturers, including the newest products on the market with the latest advances in technology. 


intermittent catheter brands at 180 medical


On top of that, our team of trained and compassionate Specialists offer customer service that is second to none. We're happy to answer your questions, provide helpful instruction and educational materials, listen to all your concerns and preferences, and help you find the right catheter for your needs.

Using a catheter after prostate cancer surgery doesn't have to be scary or embarrassing to discuss.

If you're ready to look into your your catheter product options, give us a call today and find out how easy it is to get your first order of catheters. We'll be honored to help you as you heal from your surgery and transition into self-cathing.



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What You Need to Know About Overactive Bladder

by Jessica July 2 2018 06:05
what you need to know about oab


Do you find yourself suddenly needing to go to the bathroom without warning? Do you worry about socializing or spending time away from home because you're experiencing urine leakage? Do you need to urinate more often than usual or even experience unexpected urination at night (also known as nocturia)?

If so, it's possible you may be living with a form of urinary incontinence called overactive bladder.

We want to assure you that you are not the only one dealing with this condition. In fact, overactive bladder, which is also known as OAB, affects approximately 33 million Americans. However, according to the Official Foundation of the American Urological Association, that number may be higher than reported, since there are a lot of people living with symptoms of incontinence or overactive bladder who feel embarrassed to talk about it or see their doctor.

We want to empower you with the information you need to be able to ask for help and discuss your symptoms with your treating physician. Here are some answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about overactive bladder, which we hope will help you learn more about this condition, including its symptoms, potential causes, and treatment options.


What Is Overactive Bladder?

urge incontinence oabOveractive bladder is just what it sounds like: a bladder that's working overtime.

Some of the main symptoms of overactive bladder include:

  • sudden urge to urinate
  • urine leakage
  • making more trips to the bathroom than before

Those living with overactive bladder may also experience secondary symptoms, which may include:

  • fatigue from disrupted sleep due to nocturia
  • embarrassment
  • decreased social activity
  • depression


What Causes Overactive Bladder?

aging and oabOveractive bladder can happen to anyone at any time. However, it's important to know that both age and gender may potentially be related causes.

Pelvic floor muscles and even the muscles of the bladder sometimes weaken as our bodies age. This is one of the reasons why urinary incontinence tends to happen more frequently to women than men, since hormonal fluctuations and childbirth are a common cause of weakened pelvic floor muscles.

There are a variety of other factors that could trigger an overactive bladder.

Sometimes, people may experience symptoms of overactive bladder caused by lifestyle changes. These cases are are often only temporary.

alcohol intake and overactive bladderFor example, a night of drinking a little too much alcohol can lead to increased bladder activity and even bed-wetting. Drinking too many fluids in general makes one urinate more frequently as well. Bladder irritants and diuretics like caffeine can also function in the same way, leading the body to release more urine than normal. You may want to speak to your doctor about the right amounts and types of fluid to intake for your individual needs.

However, there are some serious underlying conditions that can cause chronic urinary incontinence and overactive bladder as well. Neurological disorders like Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson’s disease carry risk factors for overactive bladder. Diabetes and kidney disease are two others.

This is why it is so important to see your doctor and get properly diagnosed, especially if your symptoms have lasted for longer than a few days or weeks. 


How is Overactive Bladder Treated?

The treatment for an overactive bladder will mainly depend on the cause.

In some of the aforementioned instances of drinking too many fluids like alcohol or coffee, a little diet modification may be all that is necessary.

gentlecath straight catheterSometimes, it's as simple as strengthening your pelvic floor muscles. Your doctor may suggest specific exercises like Kegels to help strengthen those muscles and get your bladder back in proper working order.

Your doctor may also recommend the use of intermittent catheters.

Medication may also help some people, while surgery may be required in more serious situations. 

Again, the most important thing to know is that it is absolutely normal to experience these kinds of symptoms, and it is perfectly alright to ask for help from your healthcare provider. They will not judge or shame you; they're here to help you! If you notice symptoms of overactive bladder or other changes to your urinary system, we recommend that you schedule an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible.

If your treatment plan requires the use of intermittent catheters to help treat the symptoms of overactive bladder or urinary incontinence, 180 Medical is here for you every step of the way.

As the leading catheter supplier in the nation, we carry a full line of catheter products from the top brands and manufacturers on the market today.


popular catheter brands


Our catheter specialists are ready to help you find the right catheter product for your needs and preferences. Give us a call today!


Disclaimer: This blog should not be taken as medical advice and is only intended to provide a general understanding of overactive bladder. This information should not be used in place of any recommendations, prescribed treatment plans, or medical advice from your professional healthcare provider.



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The Full Guide to No-Touch Catheters

by AmyHernandez June 26 2018 05:51



Since the introduction of clean intermittent catheterization as an alternate way to drain the bladder, there have been many advances in cathing techniques as well as new types of catheter products.

No-touch catheterization techniques and no-touch catheters have become increasingly popular over the years. This is likely due to the convenience and independence these products can offer, as well as a way to reduce the occurrence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs).

UTIs and CAUTIs can be an issue for many people who perform intermittent self-catheterization, which is why sterility is most often at the top of the list of most important things to consider when deciding which intermittent catheter type is right for you.

WHAT IS A NO-TOUCH CATHETER?

A no-touch catheter, also known as a touch-free catheter or touchless catheter, is a urinary catheter that can be inserted without the user having to directly touch the catheter tube (the portion of the catheter system that is inserted into the urethra).

No-touch catheters have been available on the market for several years; however, they are generally called closed system catheters or sterile catheter kits.

Closed system catheters are either pre-lubricated or have a hydrophilic coating that is easily activated by sterile water to become lubricated. What makes a no-touch closed system catheter truly unique is that it is an all-in-one option that is housed inside its own sterile collection bag. The catheter tube can be easily manipulated and advanced forward to insert into the urethra without touching it, which minimizes the risk of contamination from the hands.

Another benefit of closed system catheters is that the majority of them come with what is known as an introducer tip. The introducer tip is usually a pre-lubricated, soft, flexible cover that shields the tip of the actual catheter tube and helps it bypass the first short section of the urethra where the highest concentrations of bacteria can be found. This also does its part in potentially reducing the risk of contracting a UTI.

Many brands of closed systems will come packaged with additional insertion supplies that can make the cathing process even more hygienic. This may include items like gloves and antiseptic wipes.

WHY SHOULD I USE A NO-TOUCH CATHETER?

There are many reasons why using a no-touch catheter might be the best option for you, depending on your lifestyle, preferences, and needs.

Of course, the added protection against contamination from touching and bacteria, as mentioned above, is a huge reason why many people prefer and chose to use no-touch catheters.

Touch-free catheterization has been shown to be incredibly effective at preventing the onset of catheter associated UTIs in spinal cord injured people. Clinical studies have shown the use of a no-touch catheter is associated with a 30% UTI reduction and general low UTI rates of .68% in a study conducted with spinal cord injured people.

Medicare may also cover these advanced catheter products for catheters users who have experienced two or more documented urinary tract infections (UTIs) within a single year while using sterile straight intermittent catheters and sterile lubrication packets.

In hospitals, the introduction of no-touch catheter systems and techniques has been well accepted by both caregivers and patients, and has not been associated with higher costs. On the contrary, it has actually reduced costs while saving time and reducing infection complications in general, according to Clinical studies.

NO-TOUCH CATHETER OPTIONS

There are a few different options when it comes to choosing a no-touch catheter system, depending on your insurance coverage. If your insurance policy does not currently cover closed system catheters, which are billed under HCPC code A4353, you may still be able to qualify for a hydrophilic catheter.

Here are the two main options of no-touch catheters:

Closed System Catheters

Closed system catheters are the preferred cathing system for many, including people in wheelchairs, children, and those frequently travel, work, or go to school. This is because of their convenience as well as the ability to reduce the risk of infection with the all-in-one system and introducer tip, which helps minimize the risk of contamination or pushing harmful bacteria into the bladder. One of the most popular closed system catheters on the market is the Bard Touchless Plus kit, which features a patented catheter guide, allowing for better control during insertion.

Hydrophilic Catheters

Hydrophilic catheters come pre-hydrated and ready to use, or they can be easily activated by an included sterile water packet. Once it’s ready to use, the catheter stays optimally lubricated and offers a more comfortable, smooth insertion. Hydrophilic catheters work to minimize urethral friction, which can also help reduce the risk of infection. Most hydrophilic catheters are considered no-touch catheters, thanks to included handling sleeves that keep your hands off of the catheter tube and help guide the catheter into the urethra. You may be interested in the popular GentleCath™ Glide, a no-touch hydrophilic catheter for both males and females. It was created specifically to make cathing more comfortable and reduce the mess sometimes left behind by alternate brands of hydrophilic catheters.

Intermittent straight catheters are not typically considered no-touch catheters, but there are cathing techniques which can reduce the risk of contamination from your hands, such as using gloves and antiseptic wipes during your catheterization routine.

Still not sure which catheter option is right for you? Contact us today and speak with a trained catheter specialist who can help you decide which intermittent catheter is best for your unique circumstances. Your health is too important to risk not using the right catheter product.

Disclaimer: Please note that this post is not to be taken as medical advice and is only intended to provide a general understanding of the potential risks of reusing catheters according to research. This information should not be used in place of the recommendations and medical advice of your professional healthcare provider.

Sources:Bennett CJ, Young MN and Darrington H. PubMed. 1995.

Bennett CJ, Young MN, Razi SS, Adkins R, Diaz F, McCrary A. PubMed. 1997.


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About the Author:

Amy is the Web Marketing Specialist at 180 Medical. Her favorite thing about working at 180 Medical is being part of a company that is truly committed to improving the lives of its customers. When she's not at work she enjoys traveling, kayaking, rock climbing, and spending time with her husband and three, incredible stepkids.

Top 5 Ways to Make Cathing Less Painful

by Jessica April 27 2018 01:48
top 5 ways to make cathing less painful

Have you just been told you need to start using intermittent catheters, and now you're wondering how bad a catheter will hurt?

Or have you been self-cathing for a while but still find the catheterization process painful or just plain uncomfortable?

male catheter insertion painWhatever your reason for seeking help with catheter pain, know that there are many people who use catheters painlessly every day to treat their medical conditions like bladder retention or urinary incontinence, and that's a possibility for you too!

Of course, if you ever experience an abnormal amount of pain or bleeding during insertion, or if you encounter a blockage, it's important to never force your catheter. We suggest you discuss these issues with your treating healthcare professional as soon as possible. 

However, sometimes it's simply a matter of finding the right urinary catheter product that will work best for your individual needs.

Find out some of the top solutions to make cathing smooth, comfortable, and practically pain-free!


Top 5 Ways to Make Using a Catheter Hurt Less


1. Use an Intermittent Catheter With Polished or Recessed Eyelets.


catheter drainage eyeletsDrainage eyelets are the small holes near the insertion tip of your urinary catheter. Your urine drains through these holes, into the catheter tube, and out the end into your chosen receptacle like a toilet, urinal, or an attached collection bag.

Some catheter manufacturers use a process similar to punching a hole in a sheet of paper to create their catheter eyelets. This can result in rough eyelet edges that create drag and discomfort as the catheter is inserted and taken back out.

Fortunately, there are plenty of catheter options with smooth, polished eyelets, and these can greatly reduce friction on your delicate urethral tissue.

gentlecath cathetersFor example, GentleCath™ catheters are designed with recessed, polished drainage eyelets on a smooth, rounded insertion tip for maximum comfort and reduced urethral trauma.

If the catheter type you're currently using has any rough edges around the eyelets, this could very well be the source of your discomfort. 



2. Use lubrication with your uncoated catheters.

When using straight intermittent catheters, it's important to make sure you're manually lubricating them before each use. Lubrication will reduce friction and discomfort as your catheter passes through the urethra to your bladder. 

Of course, every person and each anatomy is different, so while some people don't need as much lubricating jelly, others may need more in order to have a truly comfortable catheterization. 

As the leading provider of intermittent catheters and related urological products, 180 Medical carries many high-quality and reputable brands of lubricating jelly to suit your needs, including bacteriostatic and kosher options. Whether you prefer your catheter lubrication in a tube or perfectly dosed single-use packets, we can supply it.



3. Issues getting the catheter to insert? You may need a coudé tip catheter.

gentlecath coude catheterWhy are coudé catheters necessary? This sort of curved insertion tip is only needed when straight tip catheters will not work.

This is usually due to medical conditions like urethral strictures or an enlarged prostate, which can make it difficult and even impossible for a straight tip catheter to bypass and navigate around to reach the bladder.

If you feel you're encountering a blockage or obstacle while trying to get your catheter fully inserted, it's best to speak to your urologist immediately so they can fully diagnose the problem and discuss whether you need a coudé tip catheter.



4. Experiencing itchiness or irritation after using a latex catheter? You may have a latex allergy.

Less than 1% of people in the US have a latex allergy. However, it is more common in people with certain medical conditions like spina bifida. Latex allergy development has also been associated with people who use latex urinary catheters.

If you suspect this may be the issue, contact your doctor as soon as possible.

180 Medical is sensitive to our customers' concerns and needs, so we make it a point to stock an incredibly wide variety of latex-free catheter products.

For those who prefer the softness and flexibility of red rubber latex catheters, there are many options we have available to try out, including soft catheters and silicone catheters.



5. Switch to a more advanced and modern catheter product.

Catheter technology continues to move forward, and many manufacturers are developing their urethral catheter products to be more efficient, comfortable, discreet, and convenient. 

If you've been using one type of catheter for many years, you may be happy to hear that there are all kinds of options available that may reduce urethral pain.

There are additional benefits of using advanced catheter products like hydrophilic catheters, closed system catheters, pre-lubricated catheters, and compact pocket catheters, such as potentially minimizing the risk of UTIs (urinary tract infections).

Just a few of the many advanced technology catheters that 180 Medical has in stock include:


SpeediCath® Compact Set
Available in Male Length or Female Length

speedicath compact set for men
Not only is this closed system catheter small and discreet for easy carrying, it is ready to use as soon as you open it. The catheter's hydrophilic coating is pre-activated since it is housed inside its own sterile saline solution. The lubrication will be smooth and comfortable throughout catheterization. An additional bonus of the SpeediCath® Compact Set is that the catheter comes with its own collection bag, making this a great option for those who want a more comfortable catheter that's also great for travel and use in public restrooms.

gentlecath glide hydrophilic catheter
GentleCath™ Glide Hydrophilic Catheter

Available in Male Length or Female Length


The GentleCath™ Glide is one of the newer catheter products on the market that is quickly becoming a popular option for those who want a hydrophilic catheter that is easy to use, potentially minimizes the risk of UTIs, and makes cathing super smooth and comfortable from the moment you insert the catheter until you withdraw it. Just pop the included water sachet to activate its low-friction hydrophilic coating featuring FeelClean™ technology, and it's ready to go!


LoFric Origo™ Hydrophilic Catheter
Available in Male Length, Pediatric Length, and with Coudé Tip

lofric origo hydrophilic catheter
The LoFric Origo™ has a hydrophilic coating with Urotonic™ surface technology that is activated by its own included sterile saline solution. Just as its name suggests, this catheter offers you an ultra low-friction cathing experience. An additional bonus is that the packaging is foldable and discreet, and it also doubles as a disposal bag for maximum privacy once you've finished cathing.



Still Experiencing Catheter Pain?

For first-time users, there may be some slight discomfort at first as your body adjusts to this new process of catheterization. However, if you continue feeling pain when cathing or if it even hurts too much to self-cath, please talk to your doctor before trying any other solutions on your own. 

There may be underlying medical conditions if these suggestions don't help alleviate your catheter pain. We suggest speaking with your urologist to pinpoint the issue and to come up with a solution together that will work best for your needs. 

If you need any help finding a catheter that may help reduce your discomfort during cathing, contact our specialists today!



Disclaimer: This blog is not to be taken as medical advice and is only intended to provide a general understanding of some of the product options that may reduce discomfort during intermittent catheterization. This information should not be used in place of any recommendations, prescribed treatment plans, or medical advice from your professional healthcare provider.



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MTG Eagle Board for Quadriplegic Self-Catheterizing

by Mason April 6 2018 05:37
mtg eagle board for quadriplegic self catheterization

My name is Mason Ellis. I was involved in a car accident during my senior year of high school, which rendered me quadriplegic with a C5 spinal cord injury. You can read more about my story here. Since then, I have been actively working on beating my spinal cord injury every day.

It's my goal to use my experience to help and inspire others. I like to peer mentor and volunteer when I can, and one of my primary ways of reaching out to others with spinal cord injuries is through my YouTube channel.  My wide variety of original videos include educational information about quadriplegia, including what tenodesis is and why quadriplegics sometimes experience spasms, as well as helpful how-to videos like dressing yourself as a quadriplegic.


mason ellis


Self-Cathing After a Spinal Cord Injury

After a spinal cord injury, catheterizing may be a necessity, depending on your level of injury. Using intermittent catheters can keep your bladder from over-filling and prevent leakage. However, self-cathing can be difficult if you are a quadriplegic with poor hand dexterity. 

When I was first injured as a C5 quadriplegic, I was unable to self-cath until about a year after my injury. That's when 180 Medical introduced me to the MTG EZ-Gripper® closed system catheter. 

Another helpful product I recently discovered that can help quadriplegics and others with limited hand dexterity with the process of catheterization is the MTG Eagle™ Board. The Eagle™ Board, manufactured by MTG (Medical Technologies of Georgia), was created to help catheter-users with low or limited dexterity perform self-catheterization on their own.

This adaptive cathing board, pictured below, is designed to be used with the MTG EZ-Gripper® closed system catheter and works to help with inserting your catheter into the bladder. 


mtg eagle board pictured with ez gripper catheter


MTG Eagle™ Board's Features

The MTG Eagle™ Board has many features that can help male catheter-users who live with poor hand dexterity, whether due to a spinal cord injury or another condition like transverse myelitis or spina bifida.

The MTG Eagle™ Board's unique features include:

Repositionable "Wings"
The adjustable wings on the bottom of the Eagle Board allow it to rest comfortably between your thighs at just the right angle so your urine will flow easily into your closed system catheter bag.

mtg eagle board on catheter user's lapPants Hook
The adjustable pants hook holds your pants down for you, which frees your hands and makes catheterizing much easier.

Thumb Holes
There are two thumb or finger holes near the top of the Eagle Board that allow you to easily maneuver it between your legs or pick it up with minimal effort.

Housing Clip
The housing clip works to lock the catheter down to the Eagle Board securely, leaving your hands free. 

Penile Lever
The magnetic penile lever sets the penis in place for inserting the catheter tube. 

Foam Pads
The foam pads are used to keep soft contact against your skin and can be adjusted for different body types and even replaced if worn down after many uses.

Allen Screws
The Allen screws are used to tighten the adjustable wings, which keeps the board at the proper angle for inserting the catheter tube. 

Latex-Free
Convenient for those with latex allergies. 

Convenient Size & Design
The Eagle Board is also small and compact enough that you can carry it in a backpack or briefcase with ease wherever you go. If you get it dirty, it's easy to wash off and dry or wipe down with an antibacterial wipe, so you can reuse it every time you self-cath.


mtg eagle board for self cathing


How to Use the MTG Eagle™ Board

Take a look at my full video explaining how to use the MTG Eagle™ Board to get closer look at the size and shape of this helpful adaptive cathing accessory. I discuss and point out each of its features and give you a step-by-step tutorial of how to use the Eagle™ Board as a part of your cathing routine. 



Once you adjust the wings for the proper angle and attach the MTG EZ-Gripper® catheter, supplied by 180 Medical, press down on the blue handle (gripper) on the catheter tube and move your hand toward yourself to insert the tube into your urethra until it reaches the bladder and your urine starts to flow into the bag. I also have a video showing how to use the MTG EZ-Gripper®, if you'd like to learn more about this particular closed system catheter.

I have found that the MTG Eagle™ Board allows for easy catheter insertion because it provides a flat surface to press the catheter against.

180 medical catheterization instructional materials dvd and bookletIf you are newly injured or cannot self-catheterize due to limited hand dexterity, the MTG Eagle™ Board may be a great place to start in order to gain back some of your independence and health! The Eagle™ Board Kit from MTG includes the board, a penile sizing guide, additional foam pads, an Allen wrench, and a carry bag for your convenience.

For more information about how to cath, 180 Medical's catheter specialists are ready to help you find the right catheter for your needs and can walk you through the catheterization process, step by step. They also provide handy cathing instructions online for men, women, and children, and they can put an instructional DVD and full-color booklet in your order as well.

All pictures of the MTG Eagle™ Board have been provided courtesy of MTG. You can find more information about this product at their website.



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About the Author:

mason ellis 180 medical blog authorMason Ellis was injured in a car accident on January 19, 2015, which left him with a traumatic brain injury, several broken bones included his jaws, the top six front teeth, and his collarbone. He is now a C5/6/7 quadriplegic paralyzed from the neck down. Since his accident, he has connected with others with spinal cord injuries, family members, friends, and caregivers of someone with a spinal cord injury, therapists and doctors, and able-bodied individuals too. Every day, he refuses to let his spinal cord injury defeat him. His motto is to "live life just like I would've able-bodied." 

You can learn more about Mason in his 180 Medical blog feature, or connect with him and others living with spinal cord injuries on his Facebook page or by subscribing to his YouTube Channel.

The Link Between Urinary Incontinence & Depression in Women

by Jessica February 17 2018 00:22
urinary incontinence and depression in women link

Being afraid to sneeze or laugh too hard...rushing to make it to the restroom in time...worrying about leakage...

These probably sound like familiar concerns if you're one of the 13 million people in the United States who live with urinary incontinence.

When you have urinary incontinence, fears like this are normal. However, you may find that your mood has persistently worsened over time, and you may be dealing with feelings of sadness or hopelessness that are hard if not impossible to shake off.

Although a healthcare professional will need to see you in order to properly diagnose you and get you started on a treatment plan that gets your life turned back around and back on track, it's very possible that you could be suffering from depression related to incontinence.

Still, we understand you probably want answers now before you schedule an appointment to see your doctor, and 180 Medical has the need-to-know info about incontinence and depression. We've also included some helpful resources and support options in this blog. Read on to learn more!


Who Is Affected By Urinary Incontinence?

Urinary incontinence can happen to anyone at any age, but studies show that women experience urinary incontinence twice as much as men do.

Why is that? The main factor is the pelvic anatomy of women and how it differs from that of men, as well as hormonal fluctuations that occur during menopause. 


Other potential causes of female incontinence may include:

  • Bladder muscle weakness
  • Pelvic floor weakness
  • Urinary tract infections, which can increase the urge the void your bladder and sometimes cause leakage
  • Being over the healthy weight for your body type and height
  • A medical condition from birth like spina bifida, which can also affect the bladder, depending upon severity
  • Side effects from certain medicines
  • Drinking diuretic liquids like coffee, tea, and colas
  • Certain neurological disorders

Women are also more susceptible to UTIs (urinary tract infections) and bladder infections, and this can sometimes worsen incontinence. This is because UTIs tend to increase the urge to void the bladder, sometimes involuntarily.

The additional risk of infections in women is also due to anatomy. The vagina, urethra, and anus are positioned more closely together on the female body, which makes it easier for bacteria to travel up the urethra.


depression in females with urinary incontinence

Can Urinary Incontinence Cause Depression?

As mentioned earlier, there actually is a strong link between urinary incontinence and depression, particularly in younger women. A recent paper published by researchers took a look at this connection and tried to find out the causes as well as what could be done to treat both conditions. 

One potential cause identified could be weight gain and/or childbirth, which are both commonly related to urinary incontinence as well as depression (particularly postpartum depression in the case of new mothers). The reason for this is that when the pelvic floor muscles are stretched, whether due to bearing a child, gaining weight, or other conditions, it can make it more difficult to tighten the muscles that close off the sphincter of the bladder, and this can result in mild to excessive leakage or dribbling of urine.

Another reason may be related to societal stigma regarding disorders affecting the bladder and bowels. People living with incontinence may feel like they're totally alone, or they may experience shame or embarrassment about their condition.

The research ultimately concluded that more must be done to educate women on prevention and treatment options for incontinence as well as depression. 


Treatment of Incontinence and Depression

If you are experiencing urinary incontinence and/or feelings of depression, we want to assure you that there is nothing to feel ashamed of. Millions of other people are going through this too, and even if you feel some embarrassment addressing these conditions with your doctor, they will not judge or shame you in any way. Healthcare professionals want to help their patients heal and find proper treatment plans in order to improve your condition and your overall quality of life.

Treatments depend on your personal medical history as well as the severity and type of symptoms you're experiencing.

Your doctor may also want you to record a bladder diary for several days or weeks as well, which may sound like a pain, but they may be able to provide you with an easy-to-use booklet in which to record your symptoms, when and how often you're urinating or having accidents, and other information.

urinary incontinence bladder diary appThere are also some helpful smartphone apps, such as UroBladderDiary, which may be easier for you to use. Recording this kind of information in an app rather than a written journal can also be a real help if you want to keep your symptoms private from those around you. 

While it may seem daunting right now, the sooner you can schedule an appointment with your doctor, the sooner you can get on the road to recovery.

Even if it doesn't feel like it right now, there is light ahead.


Helpful Resources and Support

A few resources and options for support, both online and in-person, can definitely be useful when you're not sure where to go next for information. 

These links may be helpful in your journey back to wellness
:

Incontinence Support Center: A Caring Community
This website has helpful articles as well as an online forum where you can talk to other women who are experiencing the same symptoms as you are.

Daily Strength Urinary Incontinence Support Group
Connect online with others living with urinary incontinence and other bladder issues. You can find support, encouragement, and tips from fellow women living with incontinence.

ADAA (Anxiety and Depression Association of America) Support Groups Near You

Find free support groups near you. This helpful website also offers facts about depression and anxiety, tips on how to deal with your feelings, and more.

Postpartum Support International
Learn more about life after having a child, including postpartum depression and potential therapy options. You also have options to call a support line and chat with a mental health expert, join an online support group for other women living with postpartum depression, and more. 

Crisis Text Line
This free support is available 24 hours a day, every day, for those in crisis. A live, trained Crisis Counselor can respond and text with you on a secure platform and help you.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
Sometimes depression and feelings of hopelessness can become so severe that you don't feel like there is any other way out of your problems, but there always is. You can visit this website, or if you need someone to speak with immediately, simply call their toll-free hotline at 1-800-273-8255 at any time of day, and someone can speak with you.


Intermittent Catheterization As Incontinence Treatment

treat your incontinence and depressionIf your doctor determines that something as simple as intermittent catheterization can help treat your urinary incontinence, our Catheter Specialists at 180 Medical are always ready to lend you a compassionate ear and walk you through your first experience of getting the right female catheter products for your individual needs. 

You will never be shamed or made to feel embarrassed when you speak with anyone at 180 Medical. This is our specialty, and we speak to many people of all ages and genders who require the use of intermittent catheters, ostomy products, and other related medical supplies.

Our goal is to help turn your life around, so we'll do what we can to make the experience of getting your catheters and other female incontinence supplies as easy and worry-free as possible. 

With the right resources and support behind you, you could be feeling like your old self again soon! If you're experiencing symptoms of incontinence or depression, it's a great idea to get the ball rolling by calling your doctor to schedule an appointment to diagnose your symptoms today.



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3 Types of Female Catheters

by Jessica February 6 2018 06:25
3 female catheter types

If your doctor has recommended intermittent catheterization as part of your treatment plan (whether due to bladder retention, urinary incontinence, multiple sclerosis, a spinal cord injury, or another medical condition that affects the way your bladder works), you may be feeling overwhelmed by the news and wondering where to start.

We want to assure you that those feelings are perfectly normal. However, once armed with the right information and the right supplies for you, using female catheters can eventually become second nature to you. 

First, learn more about the three main types of female intermittent catheters!

A Little Bit About Female Intermittent Catheters

Intermittent catheters are small tubes inserted through a urethra or a stoma to drain urine from the bladder. These are usually made of vinyl or PVC, silicone, or red rubber latex, and they are considered single-use only devices.

Catheters have come a long way since they were first invented, and innovations in technology continue to roll out with new products that may offer a smoother catheterization experience as well as better discretion and ease of use.

woman with backpack Because the female urethra is only a few inches in length compared to the male urethra, female catheters are typically around 6 inches long, although there are smaller pocket catheter options. Some women prefer to use male length catheters, which are around 16 inches long. This is based on preference and what works best for you.

Concerned about the catheter's diameter? No need to worry. Your doctor will be able to test French sizes with you and properly determine what will work best and feel comfortable for you.

The right size will help with overall comfort as well as efficiency in drainage. For example, if you use a smaller female catheter French size than what fits your body best, you may notice urine seeping around the sides of the catheter, which can literally leave a mess on your hands. If you use a larger catheter French size than necessary, you may have some difficulty with insertion, or you could experience discomfort. Making sure to get the right size prescribed before ordering will be a big component in finding the right catheter for you.

After you and your doctor have discussed size options, you'll want to start thinking about the three main intermittent catheter types available for women. 

what female catheter is right for me



Types of Catheters for Women

The three main types of intermittent catheters for women and girls are:


Straight Female Length Catheters

Considered the original technology, female length straight intermittent catheters are uncoated and must be manually lubricated prior to insertion. Usually, this is done with individual packets of sterile lubricant, although some women prefer using tubes of lubricant. These can easily be included with your catheter order, and we can take into account what may be easiest for you to use, including factors like limited hand dexterity.

Straight female catheters are fairly easy to conceal in your pocket, makeup bag, or purse. Another benefit is that straight female intermittent catheters may feel a little lighter than catheters that include additional insertion supplies or water packets, and these can make it easier to pack or carry for some people.

female straight uncoated catheters



Hydrophilic Female Length Catheters

Hydrophilic catheters are similar to straight catheters in many ways, but there's one key feature that makes hydrophilic catheters stand apart from other types. Female hydrophilic catheters have a coating that is activated by water to become slippery, smooth, and ready to use. This coating acts in place of lubricant, so you don't have to worry about carrying along additional lubricating jelly with you.

Depending on the brand, some hydrophilic catheters come with their own sterile water packet to burst inside the packaging and let the catheter soak anywhere from a few seconds to half a minute, and then it's ready to use. Others, like the popular SpeediCath Compact, are pre-packaged in their own sterile saline solution, so as soon as you open up this discreet package (designed to look similar to a makeup item like a tube of mascara or lipstick), your catheter is ready to use. Then you can dispose of it easily once you've drained your bladder.

Most hydrophilic catheter manufacturers feature a handy guiding sleeve to allow you to insert the catheter without touching the tube itself and risking potential contamination from your hands.

female hydrophilic catheters



Closed System Catheters for Women

Female closed system catheters are convenient, since they are all-in-one packages. The catheter itself is pre-lubricated and sterile inside its self-contained collection bag, which eliminates the need to carry additional lubricant. Many brands also include insertion supplies, such as gloves and antiseptic wipes. Most closed systems also have a pre-lubricated introducer tip that helps to bypass the majority of bacteria in the first few millimeters of the urethra, which minimizes the risk of infection.

Some people in wheelchairs prefer closed system catheters, since they can sometimes eliminate the need to transfer from your chair to a toilet. Thanks to the attached collection bag, you can self-cath anywhere you have privacy. 

There are options such as gripping aids for those with limited hand dexterity, as well as different materials of catheters, different collection bag sizes, and more. Our Catheter Product Specialists can discuss the different features that may appeal to you or work best for your needs.

female closed system catheters



contact 180 medical todaySince we specialize in catheters, we carry all the major catheter brands and types. You have the option to sample what might work best for you, and you have the freedom of choice to pick the brand you prefer.

When you're ready to order, 180 Medical is here to serve you and your doctor in helping to select an intermittent catheter that will be easy for you to use while giving you a hygienic, comfortable, and convenient catheterization. 

We are catheter specialists that have been in the business for over fifteen years, and we've helped thousands of women, men, and children find the right catheter supplies. Our goal is to help turn your quality of life around with high-quality female catheter products that can restore your confidence and sense of independence. Our team will also offer you unparalleled service and a compassionate, listening ear. 

We also offer educational materials like full-color brochures and DVDs offering step-by-step instructions of how to self-cath.

Give us a call at 1-877-688-2729. We'd love the opportunity to discuss your female catheter options with you! 




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180 medical jessAbout the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years and is the Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for a company that truly cares for its employees and customers.

 

180 Medical Product News: Actreen Mini Cath Catheter Set for Women

by Jessica January 16 2018 05:54
180 medical product news actreen mini cath catheter set

We like to keep you up to date on the latest catheter and ostomy products available on the market. If you're a woman who uses catheters, you may want to know more about the newest catheter option from B. Braun: the Actreen® Mini Cath Catheter Set just for females.


What to Know about the Actreen® Mini Cath Catheter Set

B. Braun understands that many female catheter-users prefer a product that's not only easy to use but offers privacy and discretion. That's exactly why they designed the Actreen® Mini Cath.

actreen mini cath set for women

Simple to open and insert, the Actreen® Mini Cath and the closed system Mini Cath Set are both made to fit discreetly in your pocket or makeup bag. With a low profile and 3.5 inch catheter length, the female Mini Cath is similar in size to a lipstick compact, and the catheter itself is coated with hydrophilic lubricant for a gentle catheterization process from insertion to withdrawal. 

An additional benefit of the Mini Cath is that its packaging features pre-cut notches and finger holes, which gives its user the ability to open the catheter package easily, even for those with limited dexterity.


Features of the Actreen® Mini Cath Catheter Set

  • 3.5 inch length for optimal discretion
  • Pre-lubricated, hydrophilic catheter with no need for water activation or additional lubrication
  • Hygienic, touch-free catheterization
  • Easy to open, easy to use (even for those with limited dexterity)
  • Not made with PVC, DEHP, or natural rubber latex
  • Lightweight and low-profile
  • Smooth eyelets
  • A discreet pouch in every box to carry your daily supply
  • Anti-reflux valve inside bag to avoid leakage
  • Currently available in 10, 12, and 14 French sizes.
  • Sterile and designed for single-use
 




How Do I Use the Actreen® Mini Cath Catheter Set?

We like to make sure you have access to all of the information you need to properly and hygienically self-catheterize. You can visit www.howtocath.com for step-by-step self-cathing instructions for women (as well as for men and children) for all catheter types including straight catheters, hydrophilic catheters, and closed systems.

Our trained Product Specialists can walk you through the process of catheterization and send you samples of the Mini Cath Catheter Set with your order. We also offer one-of-a-kind instructional materials that can be sent to you with your order as well, including printed color brochures and a DVD. 

Disclaimer: Please note that these instructions are intended to provide a general understanding of how to self-cath. This should not be used in place of your doctor's recommendations based on your personal anatomy and needs. For personalized instructions, please visit, call, or consult with your prescribing physician or other professional healthcare provider.


actreen mini cath sample


How Can I Find the Female Catheter That's Right For Me?

180 Medical carries an incredibly wide variety of intermittent catheters, including discreet pocket catheters that are perfect for travel and other female length catheters of all types from all of the major manufacturing brands on the market today. When you choose 180 Medical for your catheter supply needs, you can feel confident that you're getting the best product options available with unparalleled, friendly service.

180 medical catheter brands

Just contact us to speak to one of our trained, friendly specialists. We'll be glad to help you find the right urinary catheter that will best fit your individual preferences and needs, and we can also verify your insurance to determine if and how these products are covered on your policy. 



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About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company.

Our Top 10 Most Popular Blog Posts of 2017

by Jessica December 29 2017 14:36
180 medical's top 10 most popular blog posts of 2017

2017 has been a wonderful year for 180 Medical, and we certainly hope it's been a year of good health and fun for you too!

We posted a lot of blogs over the year, including topics like the latest catheter and ostomy product news, fun company happenings and charitable events in our community, in-depth looks at our inspiring 2017 Scholarship Program recipients, and as always, helpful and informative posts related to intermittent catheters, ostomy supplies, and more.

While we look forward ahead to all the great things coming in 2018, we've compiled this list of 180 Medical's ten most popular blog posts from 2017!


top blogs of 2017 10top blogs of 2017 10 Steps to Receiving Your Ostomy Supplies
If you are about to undergo or have recently had an ostomy surgery (whether ileostomy, urostomy, or colostomy), you're probably looking for some of the most concise, helpful basics about how to start getting the ostomy products and accessories that you will need. From getting the right fit and the necessary supplies for your individual needs to getting your very first shipment, 180 Medical is here to help and support you the whole way!


top blogs of 2017 9Why Do I Need to Use Coudé Catheters?
If you've been advised by your doctor that you need to use a curved tip or coudé catheter, you might be wondering what this kind of urinary catheter is for and why you need to use this type rather than the standard straight tip. This blog post sums up everything you need to know about what coudé catheters are, what they're used for, factors or conditions that contribute to the need to use a coudé tip instead of a straight tip catheter, as well as information on how to insert and use a coudé catheter.


top blogs of 2017 8Determined Spirit: Jen Goodwin's Story of Life After Her Spinal Cord Injury
We are honored by being able to feature some of our customers on our blog along with their unique stories, and when you read Jen's story, you can see why she is such a delight to speak with, as well as a true inspiration to all who know her. Jen could have chosen to give up after an accident left her quadriplegic. Instead, she decided to set her sights high and began achieving her goals, one after the other. A lot of readers, including everyone at 180 Medical, were awed by Jen and her incredible story.


top blogs of 2017 7Tips for Preventing the Risk of UTIs When Cathing
UTIs (urinary tract infections) are not all that uncommon to people who use catheters. Find out more about some of the most common symptoms of UTIs, some risk factors, as well as the best ways to prevent the recurrence of infections.


top blogs of 2017 6Bladder Cancer: Symptoms and Risk Factors
Did you know that bladder cancer is the 5th most commonly diagnosed cancer in the USA? It's important to know some of the potential causes/risks as well as symptoms. The sooner bladder cancer can be diagnosed, the sooner treatment and recovery can begin.


top blogs of 2017 5Tips for Holiday Travel When You Have Urinary Incontinence
Traveling around the busy holidays, whether by car or plane, can be stressful enough without also dealing with urinary incontinence. We've got the tips to help you navigate traveling, whether by car or plane, including TSA regulations for carry-on luggage, helpful smartphone apps to find public bathrooms, and other helpful information.


top blogs of 2017 4Beating Spinal Cord Injury One Day at a Time: Mason Ellis's Story
Since a car accident in Mason's senior year of high school left him quadriplegic, he has been determined to beat his injury. He has become an inspiration to many through his determination and sincere desire to connect with others and help them. Find out all about what he does now to help others, including starting up his own successful YouTube channel to help others with spinal cord injuries and limited mobility accomplish tasks like dressing, dealing with spasms, self-cathing, and more.


top blogs of 2017 3Top 10 Reasons to Work at 180 Medical
180 Medical has been voted one of the Best Places to Work in Oklahoma (based on employee's anonymous feedback) for eight years for many reasons. If you're seeking a career with a company that devotes itself to core values like compassion and integrity where you can truly make a difference, check out some of the top reasons to apply at 180 Medical.


top blogs of 2017 2What are the Basics of Clean Intermittent Catheterization?
Intermittent catheterization doesn't sound fun or easy when you're brand new to it, but with the right information and instructions at hand, you can become a seasoned pro at self-cathing. Check out our helpful post on the basics of what intermittent urinary catheters and the process of cathing is all about.


top blogs of 2017 1Pocket Catheters 101
Pocket catheters are all the buzz in the cathing world this year, and we suspect the trend for discreet, travel-ready catheters will continue as more people find out about these handy urinary catheter options. Find out all about what pocket catheters are and why they are both popular and beneficial for many catheter-users, and take a look at a few of the many options available at 180 Medical.

Thank you for reading our blog! We at 180 Medical wish you and your loved ones a happy, healthy new year to come, and we hope you'll join us for all the informative and interesting posts in 2018.


About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years and is the Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for a company that truly cares both for its employees and its customers.